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No-sugar BBQ


ERICOPOLY
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Jams? No sugar? The southerner in me just died. Try some mustard bbq sauce or some white sauce to switch it up some eric, that is once your back on the sugar bandwagon. If I'm at the local bbq joint and not a fan of the sauce, I'll occasionally throw in some texas pete/tabasco/cholula

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Stick with beef and chicken to avoid sugar. Spiced rubs work great with those two meats. I love pork BBQ but always favored the sweeter sauces with pork...no can do on a sans-sugar pork BBQ.

 

 

And, speaking for the Leucadia shareholders on the board, you'll want to make sure to purchase the Certified Angus Beef...

 

 

-Crip

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spicy dry rubs are really good when done right.

 

Most good dry rubs have some sugar.  Are you avoiding sugar altogether or just reducing the amount you use?  What about natural sugars in juices...sweet wines?

 

You can use a dry rub without sugar, but it won't offset the bitterness of your other ingredients (herbs and spices).  So it won't taste as good...more cajun, less Memphis!  Cheers!

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What about avoiding white wheat, white rice, corn, sweets, sodas, pure sugar etc... to a certain extent. These foods give you high levels of sugar and high acidic content in your blood stream. This might be a leading long term cause of cancer much more than many other suspected ones... and these are some of the main foods today...

Especially "white" carbs combined to proteins like meat being eventually stored as fat in your system... Same with potatoes when eaten with proteins...

What about considering that too many chemicals in veggies is just wrong and bad for you. But high quality veggies (especially the good kinds - you need to do some research - it is too long a subject for a board discussion) + good quality proteins is actually good for you. Agriculture has selected over time the most productive veggies to grow - not obligatorily the most nutritive.

What about considering that ingesting fat is actually necessary to healthy life and that salmon's fat is only good to you if not overcooked?

etc... etc... etc..

What about avoiding the standard "medical" way of thinking and doing you own research + applying good sense to it like you are doing with value investing? There are very knowledgeable people out about health and healthy eating and they proceed a little like value investors - by doing their own research and using a rational but also empirical approach...

For non sugar BBQ I am not sure why anyone needs sugar with a good piece of beef or chicken... But with pork ribs you can cook'em with honey and soy sauce and 5 spices - painting the ribs every 5 minutes with this mixture and this will be just divine after 2 hours. This sugar is not going to be that bad for you by the way...

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For non sugar BBQ I am not sure why anyone needs sugar with a good piece of beef or chicken... But with pork ribs you can cook'em with honey and soy sauce and 5 spices - painting the ribs every 5 minutes with this mixture and this will be just divine after 2 hours. This sugar is not going to be that bad for you by the way...

 

Same thing, whether you use sugar, honey, fruit juice, sweet wine, etc.  The sugar offsets the bitterness and acidity of other ingredients. Sugar (whatever form) also carmelizes on the outside of the meat (any meat) and that is where much of the flavour resides...especially in good BBQ with a deep rich bark.

 

For those that enjoy coffee, my favorite BBQ rub for meat also includes adding fresh, coffee grounds to the rub.  If you like to use a BBQ sauce afterwards, then simmer a pot of coffee made with the same type of coffee grounds, until thickened...mix some of the thickened brew into your BBQ sauce.  Makes for an amazing BBQ!  Cheers!

 

 

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rubs are the answer. you could try making a sauce with Maple syrup - at tleast it'll be as natural as you can get!!

 

for poultry then try brining - still need a little salt and sugar though.

 

Or just do brisket with a rub - it's a longer cook but well worth it.

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  • 3 months later...

I have a green egg as well.I use it all the time.Here is a S.C. mustard sauce I use on pulled pork and chicken.Has very little sugar and is very good.

3⁄4 cup yellow mustard

3⁄4 cup cider vinegar

1 tablespoon light brown sugar

1 1⁄2 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 teaspoons salt

2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

1 1⁄4 teaspoons fresh ground black pepper

2 teaspoons louisiana hot sauce (to taste)

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This stuff is insanely good -- and no sugar or fat:

 

Scott's Spicy Carolina Barbecue Sauce

http://tinyurl.com/qyed9h6

 

I smoked a couple of brined chickens in the Big Green Egg -- with this sauce it's heaven.

 

Apparently a no-sugar vinegar based BBQ sauce is North Carolina style.

 

First time I tried it -- so divine.

 

Eastern North Carolina is vinegar, Western NC is tomato based sauce. Both are delicious.

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I don't know how deeply y'all want to go into this  ;) but, here is a start:

 

There are a variety of styles of BBQ and sauce.  Many (not all) of the best suggest having the meat flavored, i.e. brined or rubbed, which is then cooked and either finished with the sauce, say last 10-15 with sauce on or just at the table.  Many variation here, but this, I believe is a slight majority of the best. (This is somewhat arbitrary, but bear with me here.)

 

Personally I find some of the sauces way too sweet for me but that is a personal preference.  If you want to make your own sauce you can use any of the sugar alcohol type of sweeteners that mimic regular sugar.  (Generally, they have little to none of the insulin/glycemic problems that sugar has, and if you are eating BBQ you, I suspect this is not a caloric issue.) Mostly I use Xylitol when I need a sugar substitute it my sauces, but does not work for yeast bread, but is good for the teeth.

 

Parsad brings up the balance of flavors, the sugar does counter the tartness, and most vinegars have some sugars in them anyway, but the Maillard reaction, i.e. browning happens to the meat from the existing proteins in the meat anyway, but some brines and rubs have sugar in them, which adds to the browning. 

 

Note that in Stone19's recipe, he uses Worcestershire sauce.  This and similar types of additions, soy and anchovy add a umami flavor, if you will to the sauce.  Now my mom's recipe was a combo of lemon and a bit of anchovy--not enough to taste the fish essence. She would put the whole lemon slices in the sauce, but remove them before company came lest her recipe be found out.  These two ingredients  she added either to the standard tomato backed sauce or the vinegar style.  My riff on this is to use fish sauce, just a bit, and Ponzu juice, if I do not have any fresh Meyer lemons around.  If you want more adventure, chop a handful of cilantro and parley and add that as well.

 

Side note, with all the fat and protein of the meat, glycemic load is probably not a problem.  And 4 stars,  **** for the Salt Lick!

 

Best,

 

Netnet

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