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BAC Capital Plan Approved...JPM & Goldman Flagged


Parsad
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Bank of America Plans to Repurchase up to $5 Billion in Common Shares and Redeem Approximately $5.5 Billion in Preferred Stock

Thursday, March 14, 2013 08:45:00 PM (GMT)

 

 

Bank of America today announced that the company’s Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $5.0 billion of common stock and the redemption of approximately $5.5 billion in preferred stock.

 

The Federal Reserve Board has informed the company that it completed its 2013 Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review and that it did not object to the company’s capital plan, including proposed capital actions.

 

"We have simplified our company and we have more than adequate capital to support our strategic plans. We are well positioned to return excess capital to our shareholders,” said Chief Executive Officer Brian Moynihan. “We believe buying back common shares is the best way to continue to drive value for our shareholders.”

 

The timing and exact amount of common share repurchases will be consistent with the company’s capital plan and will be subject to various factors, including the company’s capital position, liquidity, financial performance and alternative uses of capital, stock trading price, and general market conditions, and may be suspended at any time. The common share repurchases may be effected through open market purchases or privately negotiated transactions, including Rule 10b5-1 plans, over the next four quarters. The company’s 2013 capital plan did not include a request to increase the quarterly common stock dividend rate of $0.01 per share.

 

The company’s Board of Directors also approved the redemption of all the outstanding shares of two series of the company’s preferred stock. The 8.20% Non-Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series H, will be redeemed on May 1, 2013, and the 8.625% Non-Cumulative Preferred Stock, Series 8, will be redeemed on May 28, 2013. The redemption price for each of these preferred stock series will be 100 percent of the liquidation preference per share, as specified in the company’s certificate of incorporation. Notice of redemption for each series, including notice to holders of depositary shares representing fractional interests in each redeemed series of preferred stock, will be sent on or around April 1, 2013.

 

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BAC to buy back $5b of shares.

 

Bank of America today announced that the company’s Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $5.0 billion of common stock and the redemption of approximately $5.5 billion in preferred stock. The Federal Reserve Board has informed the company that it completed its 2013 Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review and that it did not object to the company’s capital plan, including proposed capital actions. "We have

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Parsad

It is way more than $7B that you predicted.

It is 10.5B

 

You are the winner!

 

I think Ericopoly should buy the whole board a beer when BAC goes over $20 early next year!  Then we can take turns getting a ride in his Netjets plane...he can just get them to taxi us around the runway.  ;D  Cheers!

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Actually Sanjeev lost since he predicted $7 billion returned to shareholders. We are only getting $5 billion back. The other $5.5 billion is to buyback debt. That is what a preferred really is. I don't consider it any different than what they have been doing all year or retiring long term debt.

 

I am quite disappointed here. A dividend increase would have attracted investors and paid me while I wait. $5 billion buyback does very little at their size and also since it is not a mandatory thing. They could decide to buyback only $3 billion if they find the price too high. What is too high for them?

 

Cardboard

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Actually Sanjeev lost since he predicted $7 billion returned to shareholders. We are only getting $5 billion back. The other $5.5 billion is to buyback debt. That is what a preferred really is. I don't consider it any different than what they have been doing all year or retiring long term debt.

 

I am quite disappointed here. A dividend increase would have attracted investors and paid me while I wait. $5 billion buyback does very little at their size and also since it is not a mandatory thing. They could decide to buyback only $3 billion if they find the price too high. What is too high for them?

 

Cardboard

 

Isn't debt reduction accretive to equity holders?  I'm fine with what they are doing.

 

 

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Actually Sanjeev lost since he predicted $7 billion returned to shareholders. We are only getting $5 billion back. The other $5.5 billion is to buyback debt. That is what a preferred really is. I don't consider it any different than what they have been doing all year or retiring long term debt.

 

I am quite disappointed here. A dividend increase would have attracted investors and paid me while I wait. $5 billion buyback does very little at their size and also since it is not a mandatory thing. They could decide to buyback only $3 billion if they find the price too high. What is too high for them?

 

Cardboard

 

The preferreds count towards capital, debt doesn't. I do agree that a div increase might pop the share up more, but they are improving the earnings power by getting rid of expensive after tax prefs.

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Actually Sanjeev lost since he predicted $7 billion returned to shareholders. We are only getting $5 billion back. The other $5.5 billion is to buyback debt. That is what a preferred really is. I don't consider it any different than what they have been doing all year or retiring long term debt.

 

I am quite disappointed here. A dividend increase would have attracted investors and paid me while I wait. $5 billion buyback does very little at their size and also since it is not a mandatory thing. They could decide to buyback only $3 billion if they find the price too high. What is too high for them?

 

Cardboard

 

Not debt...preferreds.  No immediate obligation to retire them like debt.  Buying back the preferreds is capital return, as they could have simply chosen to pay the interest on them.

 

Sanjeev, good call… congrats!!! Perhaps you should frame the Dollar...

 

 

No, I plan on spending it.  I'm going to buy Kraven a chocolate bar...a "100 Grand" bar...I promised him a good return on capital!  ;D  Cheers! 

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I win the bet Kraven...$10.5B!  Where's my dollar...it's worth $1.02 Canadian...I can get alot for that extra 2 cents.  ;D  Cheers!

 

Not so fast my good sir. The bet was $7 bil returned to the COMMON. I was very clear about it and asked that you confirm. I can't find it right now but go back to where we bet. I am still winning here. I will happily pay when it's $7 bil to the common. There is still 9.5 months to go.

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Actually Sanjeev lost since he predicted $7 billion returned to shareholders. We are only getting $5 billion back. The other $5.5 billion is to buyback debt. That is what a preferred really is. I don't consider it any different than what they have been doing all year or retiring long term debt.

 

I am quite disappointed here. A dividend increase would have attracted investors and paid me while I wait. $5 billion buyback does very little at their size and also since it is not a mandatory thing. They could decide to buyback only $3 billion if they find the price too high. What is too high for them?

 

Cardboard

 

I too am very disappointed.  I wanted to see a reasonable dividend increase.  Share buybacks are too easy to cancel in a moment of trouble.  I dont think they have done enough and its going to weigh on the share price for another year.  This is going to keep big pension funds out because the dividend doesn't meet thresholds.  Not happy at all.  3 billion towards a dividend would have been approved.  Moynihan has not done what he stated he would do which was to split the money between buybacks and dividend, or else the fed told them not to ask. 

 

Now, we just have the cash piling on the balance sheet.  Not a good thing. 

 

 

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I too am very disappointed.  I wanted to see a reasonable dividend increase.  Share buybacks are too easy to cancel in a moment of trouble.  I dont think they have done enough and its going to weigh on the share price for another year.  This is going to keep big pension funds out because the dividend doesn't meet thresholds.  Not happy at all.  3 billion towards a dividend would have been approved.  Moynihan has not done what he stated he would do which was to split the money between buybacks and dividend, or else the fed told them not to ask. 

 

Now, we just have the cash piling on the balance sheet.  Not a good thing.

 

If they're going to do buybacks, I'd rather it be at low prices than high prices. They can always do a bigger dividend later, but for now, buybacks seem like a better use of capital IMO, and if the absence of a higher dividend allows them to buy cheaper, I think it's a good thing.

 

And if in the meantime they keep piling up capital on the balance sheet, it just means a bigger dividend and buyback next year, and a more solid balance sheet in the meantime, so it's not lost.

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