Jump to content

Do You Really Need This?


Parsad
 Share

Recommended Posts

Starbucks is adding a larger cup size..."Trenta"...which will be much bigger than a "Venti".  Do you guys really need this?

 

http://www.cnbc.com/id/41106727

 

This is like gun control in the U.S.  You really, really need it, but apparently "Guns don't kill, people do!"  I'm guessing this is the same thing..."Supersized foods don't kill, people do!" 

 

I hope Health Canada puts strict limits on new products here.  We're starting to already see changes in certain areas on the municipal and provincial level, but not federal yet such as on trans fats levels, fat content in street foods, etc.  Cheers!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 111
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I would think that the caffeine hit from a 31 ounce coffee would almost certainly be fatal.

 

I believe a "Venti" has at least two shots of espresso, so I would think that a "Trenta" would have at least three. 

 

The only time I order anything bigger than a "Tall" coffee is when Starbucks sends me a free birthday gift where I can order any drink I want.  I thought the "Venti" was too large and full of caffeine.  I'm not sure how somebody handles the new bigger drink...and all the sugar and fat!  Cheers!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As it is no one I know orders the venti size. This trenta strikes me as something that will be akin to the 7-11 super big gulp: people make fun of it, but few if any actually buy it. Seems to be a good indicator that SBUX management is out of ideas.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is it the role of the Canadian government (or any government in the world) to put a limit on how much coffee people can drink? Or by extension how much food they should eat every day?

 

Probably not, but I sure see alot of kids around that are suffering because their parents choose to exercise that right.  In that regard, should we remove the role of Social Services to monitor the welfare of children? 

 

I'm not one for the government intervening in every facet of our lives, but unfortunately maybe there are certain circumstances where intervention is warranted...the mortgage industry from 2004-2007 comes to mind.  Cheers!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is it the role of the Canadian government (or any government in the world) to put a limit on how much coffee people can drink? Or by extension how much food they should eat every day?

 

Yeah, I am pretty tired of the nanny state these days.  I think my last straw was being reached when people start talking about legislating helmets for downhill skiing where the hazard is miniscule, as compared to bikes or hockey.  If they start looking at foods they would have to outlaw nearly every fast food outlet presently operating since about none of them have products without refined carbohydrates.

 

Now my perverse way of thinking has me visualizing a java junkie shooting up a Startbucks after overdosing from his Trenta.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, I am pretty tired of the nanny state these days.  I think my last straw was being reached when people start talking about legislating helmets for downhill skiing where the hazard is miniscule, as compared to bikes or hockey.  If they start looking at foods they would have to outlaw nearly every fast food outlet presently operating since about none of them have products without refined carbohydrates.

 

Now my perverse way of thinking has me visualizing a java junkie shooting up a Startbucks after overdosing from his Trenta.

 

I'm not talking about outlawing junk food.  Junk food itself is not the problem.  Exceedingly high levels of calories, saturated fat, trans fats, etc per meal is the problem.  Buffett eats junk food, but he makes sure he consumes only his daily caloric intake.  The coffee drink isn't the problem...the size of the drink is.  Cheers!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Probably not, but I sure see alot of kids around that are suffering because their parents choose to exercise that right.  In that regard, should we remove the role of Social Services to monitor the welfare of children?

 

I'm not one for the government intervening in every facet of our lives, but unfortunately maybe there are certain circumstances where intervention is warranted...the mortgage industry from 2004-2007 comes to mind.  Cheers!

 

I have four children from 2 to 11. I think it's my responsibility to feed them and to make sure that they are in good health. I would not want the government to intervene with my (and my wife's) choices. If governments start to tell me what my kids should eat and drink, where does it end?

 

I see lots of kids who watch way too much TV. Should the government pass a law that limits how much TV children can watch? Would you agree with that?

 

Re the mortgage industry, I think the crisis was primarily triggered by the Fed keeping interest rates too low for way too long. It fed the speculation as it did in 1996-1999 with the internet bubble and as it is doing now... There were also several federal watchdogs that did not do their jobs. So, I think we would have been better off without any government intervention and let the markets correct themselves. People won't learn to be responsible if they don't pay for their mistakes.

 

Eric

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is it the role of the Canadian government (or any government in the world) to put a limit on how much coffee people can drink? Or by extension how much food they should eat every day?

 

Probably not, but I sure see alot of kids around that are suffering because their parents choose to exercise that right.  In that regard, should we remove the role of Social Services to monitor the welfare of children? 

 

I'm not one for the government intervening in every facet of our lives, but unfortunately maybe there are certain circumstances where intervention is warranted...the mortgage industry from 2004-2007 comes to mind.  Cheers!

 

The government had a greater right and responsibility to step into the credit crisis than would be the case in the beverage industry. From NRSRO ratings requirements, to GSEs, ERISA, FDIC insurance, and primary dealers, the government is a huge participant in American finance.

 

Who is to say that super-size purchasers are not pacing their coffee throughout the day, or making a rational trade off between health and productivity?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not talking about outlawing junk food.  Junk food itself is not the problem.  Exceedingly high levels of calories, saturated fat, trans fats, etc per meal is the problem.  Buffett eats junk food, but he makes sure he consumes only his daily caloric intake.  The coffee drink isn't the problem...the size of the drink is.  Cheers!

 

More recent evidence suggests that it is not fat or trans fat that are the main culprits but refined carbohydrates.  Low fat diets may be part of the problem in that they by their very nature force people to eat more refined carbs such as pasta, white breads, potatoes, and sugar.  If you look at virtually any fast food outlet they are purveyors of refined carbs these days (fries, coke, pepsi, white bread or faux grain bread, sugar, and refined corn based sugar products).  Looking at labels of my kids' processed foods shows where the real problem actually lies and its definitely not dietary fat.

 

Its not even food volume that is the problem.  As for Buffett, we dont really know what he eats on a day to day basis.  For more on the topic I may suggest reading "Good Calories, Bad Calories" by Gary Taubes.  A very insightful book.

 

Finally, a 1 litre coffee is ludicrous but then you have always been able to get a bottomless cup in diners across the US.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No one obviously needs this, although I'm sure many will order it.

 

I'll stick to my usual though.  A Grande brewed coffee(hot or iced) black w/no sugar. Or sometimes I just ask for 3 shots of espresso, again no cream, no milk (steamed or otherwise), nor any sugar.

 

I like coffee and espresso that's it. Most people seem to like hot coffee-flavored-sweetened milk and 6000 calorie cold coffee milkshakes.  To each their own. That's what makes the market work. If nobody buys these Starbucks will stop offering them.  And even if everybody else buys these, you still don't have to. 

 

--Eric

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I may suggest reading "Good Calories, Bad Calories" by Gary Taubes.  A very insightful book.

 

I just finished that book a few weeks ago, then I read his follow-on book "Why We Get Fat", which is much shorter. It summarizes his first book then goes on to talk about a few more studies that have been done since "Good Calories, Bad Calories" was published in 2006.  I would recommend everyone read both of these whether or not you have a weight problem/diabetes/heart disease/etc.  It will change the way you look at food and the science of nutrition, as well as all the politics involved.

 

BTW, I've lost 18lbs in the last two weeks and feel better than I have in years. 

Also I've been drinking my coffee black with no sugar for about 15 years, it just happens to fit into my new diet nicely.

 

--Eric

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a side note, Starbucks does not have a 'small' cup on their menu. 

 

If you want to purchase a small cup of coffee, you must ask for a 'short cup'.

 

I believe I am the only patron at our local establishment to order such an odd creature.

 

 

Cheers

JEast

Link to comment
Share on other sites

uccmal is right. it is the refined food that is the problem

 

I recommend folks to watch this video by Dr Robert Lustig

 

 

The coming obesity epidemic has lot of ramifications. Berkshire may even sell KO stake in not so distant future.

 

The recipe for disaster is this, productivity, over production, portions increase, over consumption, lethargy, addiction to video games/facebook/modern technology, hawking of junk foods to kids, lack of exercise, stressed/overworked parents, modern convenience/comforts, govt policy a.k.a conspiracy (subsidizing food costs, making fresh grown vegetable 5-10 times more expensive than soda/chips), fat parents spawning fat kids... vicious cycle repeats

 

fact is, there is no easy solution. one side there is talk of freedom to choose, other side there is talk of nanny state. I was talking to a group of doctors and one said, the sad truth is, you can let a man die in cold under a bridge of hunger. but if he is sick, he can be admitted and get treatment for free. So overweight/obesity is like finance, private profits , socialized risk. Bravo.

 

As a Berkie shareholder & WEB/Munger fan, I'm ashamed that Buffett will drink 6-10 cans of coke and eat chocolates in front of adoring fans. Is he setting a right example? No one knows the exercise he is doing to burn those calories.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I may suggest reading "Good Calories, Bad Calories" by Gary Taubes.  A very insightful book.

 

 

BTW, I've lost 18lbs in the last two weeks

 

--Eric

 

 

You must be losing a lot of fluid?  Are you bleeding?

 

Fat has about 3,500 (working from memory) calories per pound.  In 14 days, you haven't lost 18 lbs of fat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share




×
×
  • Create New...