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Compounding Returns as of 2012


racemize
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What is your compounding rate of return since you started as of 2012?  

116 members have voted

  1. 1. What is your compounding rate of return since you started as of 2012?

    • 0-4.99
    • 5-9.99
    • 10-14.99
    • 15-19.99
    • 20-24.99
    • 25-29.99
    • 30-39.99
    • 40-49.99
    • > 50


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Since we're doing the 2012 results, let's also see your overall compounding rates since you started (ignore your own fees, but include everything else).  If you feel like posting, please indicate date you started and AUM (if you feel comfortable doing so).

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I'm not answering in the poll because I don't know.  I've been using Fidelity's "your rate of return" feature at years end since 2009 and keeping track:

 

70.9% in 2009

21.2% in 2010

12.7% in 2011

9.4% in 2012

 

The problem is that Fidelity will only go back 24 months and I've been managing my own portfolio since about 1997.  I have a text file with every transaction I've ever made in it, I just need some software to enter it all into.  Anyone have any suggestions?  I've thought about a spreadsheet, but what about splits, dividends, and symbols which no longer exist.

 

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Think my IRR is around 14% since starting investing in individual stocks since 2H2010.

 

The problem is that Fidelity will only go back 24 months and I've been managing my own portfolio since about 1997.  I have a text file with every transaction I've ever made in it, I just need some software to enter it all into.  Anyone have any suggestions?  I've thought about a spreadsheet, but what about splits, dividends, and symbols which no longer exist.

Depends on what you want to calculate how hard it is. If you just want to figure out your IRR you could calculate it based on just the timing of your cash in- and outflows (assuming that's also in your list of transactions). Anything more complicated is probably going to require a complicated excel sheet and lots of manual editing for dividends/splits/delistings...

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I'm not answering in the poll because I don't know.  I've been using Fidelity's "your rate of return" feature at years end since 2009 and keeping track:

 

70.9% in 2009

21.2% in 2010

12.7% in 2011

9.4% in 2012

 

The problem is that Fidelity will only go back 24 months and I've been managing my own portfolio since about 1997.  I have a text file with every transaction I've ever made in it, I just need some software to enter it all into.  Anyone have any suggestions?  I've thought about a spreadsheet, but what about splits, dividends, and symbols which no longer exist.

 

Yeah, I just use a spreadsheet (I have one for every year, and one that keeps track of all inflows and outflows since inception).  From that, I use the xirr function.  I also keep track of the TWRR via a different formula, but it is essentially the same as my IRR at this point.

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Well, I can see that I'm the reckless one of the bunch...

 

+67.25 annualized in my wife's RothIRA from 2/28/2005 until end of November (and up another 32.6% in December).

+70.41% annualized in my RothIRA from 1/31/2003 until end of November (and up another 35.7% in December)

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What would it have been if you hadn't done the fairfax options trade?

 

I made money in Fairfax options in 2006, 2007, 2008, and in 2009.  However, by "the fairfax options trade" I presume you mean 2006 as that was the big year.

 

Fidelity reports (excluding December 2012):

 

My RothIRA:

+40.93%  3 yr annualized return

+69.30%  5 yr annualized return

 

Wife's RothIRA:

+50.59%  3 yr annualized return

+58.22%  5 yr annualized return

 

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CAGR 8 yrs: 39.4 (done by adding returns each year and dividing by 8 years). 

To calculate a CAGR you should multiply the returns for every year and take the result to the power of 1/8. Otherwise you will be overstating the CAGR if you don't have identical returns every year.

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I'm running about 22% for the last 4 years when I took control of my 401k - no leverage.

 

I took over because I was accepting advice that I didn;t agree with - and lost a chunk in Lehman Bros.

I have found that since then I'm capable of making my own investing mistakes instead of lettign other people screw up my retirement funds for me!

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