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Perfect 10? Never Mind That. Ask Her for Her Credit Score. (Dating advice)


stahleyp
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After Alnesh went through his divorce, he decided he's going to ask for tax returns from prospective partners...they must bring equal or better assets and income into the relationship!  ;D  So far no dates...may have to modify his request!  Cheers!

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After Alnesh went through his divorce, he decided he's going to ask for tax returns from prospective partners...they must bring equal or better assets and income into the relationship!  ;D  So far no dates...may have to modify his request!  Cheers!

 

He should just rent instead of buying, its often cheaper  8)

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CONeal knows what he is speaking about. Credit scoring is a joke as it ignores assets like cash, investments, and property. But the more debt you have the better so long as you are servicing it. If you have no debt then they seem to assume you don’t own anything. No mortgage - then he must not own a home. No car loan - then he probably doesn’t have a car... 

 

Many years ago, before credit scoring was widely credit histories were kept on card files that were updated manually. Whenever two people married their files were inter-referenced. As cards were being matched up I can remember frequently hearing, “OMG, does he (she) know what they are getting into?” (More often “he” than “she”)

 

I have always believed that before a marriage licence is issued it should be mandated that a mutual disclosure of credit histories be made.

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About ten years ago on my first date with the gal thats now my wife, I paid for dinner at a very nice place in cash. After we got married and were reminiscing about our dating our first date came up. She said she thought I must have credit problems because I paid cash for the meal.

 

Amazing how first impressions can be wrong!

 

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Credit scores seem to be more of an indication that you are willing to take on debt and pay interest. If you have too much assets and too much income, then you pose prepayment risk. What they want are people who have stable jobs and the type who believe it is their moral obligation to pay off debt (rather the one people who are happy doing strategic defaults). Logically, bankruptcy should actually increase someone's ability to take on new debt and pay off new debt. If the income is the same, would you rather loan money to someone who has $1M of debt or someone with 0 debt? Funny thing is, the former is likely to have a great credit score while the latter has a terrible one. It might actually be a red flag if someone knows their exact credit score off the top of their head. I have no idea what my credit score is because I don't borrow money (except on my credit card that I repay immediately).

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I always stress that I have a sizeable hidden asset and that it will double in the event of a merger.

 

Can't believe I'm still single.

 

alwaysinvert, I understand you, man.  In a merger, with good hidden assets, whether it's First-In-First-Out or Last-In-First-Out, you can end up with a great credit score.  It can go both ways.

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