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Man's Search for Meaning - Viktor Frankl


boilermaker75
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There was a thread on which books you have read more than once. I read this book a long time ago, but it has always been in the back of my mind to read it again. I loaned my copy to someone, and as usually the case with loaning books you never see them again.

 

Today the kindle version is on sale for $1.99, which I have purchased.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Mans-Search-Meaning-Viktor-Frankl-ebook/dp/B009U9S6FI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1514825252&sr=8-1&keywords=man%27s+search+for+meaning

 

Edit: Frankl was a neurologist and psychiatrist who survived the Auschwitz concentration camp. The book is about the characteristics of those that survived.

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I've read this in February for the first time myself. Definitely a book you can benefit from reading once every few years or even yearly. One of the few books I gave 5/5 on Goodreads.

 

It's a good book, however, like most philosophy books, the way to get these abstractions in with people isn't through intellectualizing them or learning about them. Hence, why you can study say existentialism for 20 years and not get meaninglessness other than a concept while someone can learn through experiential means and get it within just a few days. I find stuff like this interesting but reading about it is a highly inefficient way of getting it.

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I read this book after boilermaker's recommendation.

It's a short book which can be read slowly.

One of the messages is that it is not necessary to suffer to find meaning in life. If unavoidable, the author candidly reveals how he found meaning during a life-changing event. Reading the book was easier than going through three years of concentration camp exposure.

 

 

 

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I read this book after boilermaker's recommendation.

It's a short book which can be read slowly.

One of the messages is that it is not necessary to suffer to find meaning in life. If unavoidable, the author candidly reveals how he found meaning during a life-changing event. Reading the book was easier than going through three years of concentration camp exposure.

 

I really like your dry humor. Possibly a bit underappreciated on CoBF. 8)

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"Reading the book was easier than going through three years of concentration camp exposure."

 

I certainly hope so!

 

This is reassuring. I was worried that wouldn't be the case.  I'll have to pick up a copy.

 

Unfortunately it isn't $1.99 anymore.  I'm putting it on my to read list.  Hopefully it will go on sale again.

 

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"Reading the book was easier than going through three years of concentration camp exposure."

 

I certainly hope so!

 

At the recommendation of a guide at Auschwitz I read "I was dr Mengele's assistent" or "A doctor's eyewitness account" (same book, different title I believe). By far the most harrowing book I've read about Auschwitz / WWII in general and I've read quite a few. The writer just sticks to the cold, hard facts and yet that makes it so much worse. I thought it was far more gripping than Primo Levi or other books about the subject. I literally lost some sleep over this book after reading it - first book that made me do so in a long, long time. The part where they find a little girl that somehow survived the gas chambers .. pffff.  I guess reading this equals a few minutes of camp exposure .. Horrific but recommended.

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