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Shareholder meeting attire


CONeal
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How is one suppose to dress when attending a shareholder meeting?  Suit?  slacks and button up?  Shorts and t-shirt?  Ok the last one was a joke.

 

Never attended one before so would like to make sure I dress appropriately.

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How is one suppose to dress when attending a shareholder meeting?  Suit?  slacks and button up?  Shorts and t-shirt?  Ok the last one was a joke.

 

Never attended one before so would like to make sure I dress appropriately.

 

I would recommend a suit and tie especially if you get a chance to talk to the executives one on one.  Just my opinion and what I've done at annual meetings.

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I'd say it depends on the company and location.  Obvious (or not) the further from a big city the less dressed up a place is going to be.  So if you're in a small town in Kansas for a small company a suit is overkill.  Here is a random guide I made up but I think is appropriate:

 

Manufacturing - Business casual, or dress pants + dress shirt, tie optional (suits are for bankers and lawyers at the meeting, they'll be readily identifiable.)

 

A tech company - You'd probably be fine wearing jeans and a dress shirt.

 

Insurance/Bank/Finance - Suit, unless this is a community bank annual meeting, and if it's in a small town maybe lose the coat.

 

A major company - Are you also a major shareholder, then see below, otherwise; doesn't matter, they don't care about you or your input, maybe wear a body suit, at least they'd remember you.

 

You're under 23 - Wear anything, you're young and people will underestimate you no matter what you wear.  Really young and a suit, looks like you're ready to sell an annuity.

 

You work for a bank - Are you allowed to wear anything but a suit?  Better check with compliance

 

You work for a small fund - Dress up, you want to impress this holding and hopefully work with them in the future.

 

You work for a major fund - Wear whatever, you own enough shares that you've got the execs by the balls anyways, dress doesn't matter.

 

You're a retiree and long time shareholder - Anything from a Hawaiian shirt and shorts to a dressy outfit works, the reverse of the 23 year old, no matter what you wear you'll be respected (unless you're wearing one of those goofy safari hats too.)

 

 

 

 

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I'd say it depends on the company and location.  Obvious (or not) the further from a big city the less dressed up a place is going to be.  So if you're in a small town in Kansas for a small company a suit is overkill.  Here is a random guide I made up but I think is appropriate:

 

Manufacturing - Business casual, or dress pants + dress shirt, tie optional (suits are for bankers and lawyers at the meeting, they'll be readily identifiable.)

 

A tech company - You'd probably be fine wearing jeans and a dress shirt.

 

Insurance/Bank/Finance - Suit, unless this is a community bank annual meeting, and if it's in a small town maybe lose the coat.

 

A major company - Are you also a major shareholder, then see below, otherwise; doesn't matter, they don't care about you or your input, maybe wear a body suit, at least they'd remember you.

 

You're under 23 - Wear anything, you're young and people will underestimate you no matter what you wear.  Really young and a suit, looks like you're ready to sell an annuity.

 

You work for a bank - Are you allowed to wear anything but a suit?  Better check with compliance

 

You work for a small fund - Dress up, you want to impress this holding and hopefully work with them in the future.

 

You work for a major fund - Wear whatever, you own enough shares that you've got the execs by the balls anyways, dress doesn't matter.

 

You're a retiree and long time shareholder - Anything from a Hawaiian shirt and shorts to a dressy outfit works, the reverse of the 23 year old, no matter what you wear you'll be respected (unless you're wearing one of those goofy safari hats too.)

 

genius

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I'd say it depends on the company and location.  Obvious (or not) the further from a big city the less dressed up a place is going to be.  So if you're in a small town in Kansas for a small company a suit is overkill.  Here is a random guide I made up but I think is appropriate:

 

Manufacturing - Business casual, or dress pants + dress shirt, tie optional (suits are for bankers and lawyers at the meeting, they'll be readily identifiable.)

 

A tech company - You'd probably be fine wearing jeans and a dress shirt.

 

Insurance/Bank/Finance - Suit, unless this is a community bank annual meeting, and if it's in a small town maybe lose the coat.

 

A major company - Are you also a major shareholder, then see below, otherwise; doesn't matter, they don't care about you or your input, maybe wear a body suit, at least they'd remember you.

 

You're under 23 - Wear anything, you're young and people will underestimate you no matter what you wear.  Really young and a suit, looks like you're ready to sell an annuity.

 

You work for a bank - Are you allowed to wear anything but a suit?  Better check with compliance

 

You work for a small fund - Dress up, you want to impress this holding and hopefully work with them in the future.

 

You work for a major fund - Wear whatever, you own enough shares that you've got the execs by the balls anyways, dress doesn't matter.

 

You're a retiree and long time shareholder - Anything from a Hawaiian shirt and shorts to a dressy outfit works, the reverse of the 23 year old, no matter what you wear you'll be respected (unless you're wearing one of those goofy safari hats too.)

 

genius

 

Genius +1 :)

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Well I started working for a local bank this year in a small town and I only wear suits on days with meetings and the like. I'm only 22 and feel that a suit creates more distance and gives less confidence to customers, because you look more like a salesman. I'd rather be viewed as the friendly neighbour who helps them out and doesn't come over as to 'haughty'. I do of course wear a dress shirt, groomed pullover, nice pants and decent shoes. No jeans etc. :D

 

Clothes aren't everything and I'd care very little about what I wear as a small shareholder and probably even as a big one.

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I'd say it depends on the company and location.  Obvious (or not) the further from a big city the less dressed up a place is going to be.  So if you're in a small town in Kansas for a small company a suit is overkill.  Here is a random guide I made up but I think is appropriate:

 

Just curious, have you attended a small town analyst meeting in Kansas? Seems like a long way from home for you...

 

Great guide!

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I'd say it depends on the company and location.  Obvious (or not) the further from a big city the less dressed up a place is going to be.  So if you're in a small town in Kansas for a small company a suit is overkill.  Here is a random guide I made up but I think is appropriate:

 

Just curious, have you attended a small town analyst meeting in Kansas? Seems like a long way from home for you...

 

Great guide!

 

No, I haven't, but my experience on that is through my brother who works with a lot of manufacturing companies.  He was told before one sales call/company visit in a small town that if he wore anything more than a polo and khakis he might as well not even go, the deal would be dead if he walked in the door dressed up. 

 

Another general thought this response kicked off.  I'd say what's even more important than dress is your knowledge and interest in the company.  If you're underdressed but are very knowledgable and very interested in the company (not the financials, but what they actually do) employees will talk, and they'll be happy to talk.  People love to explain what they do, benefit from this.

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