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http://www.businessinsider.com/oakland-police-chief-threatens-to-cut-911-service-if-layoffs-go-as-planned-2010-7

 

The U.S. has been successful because of innovation and establishing the rule of law. If we get to a point where police officers don't even provide a basic sense of safety to citizens what is going to happen? These guys are threatening, but I think it is more than that since eventually you get down to a lower limit in workforce where you really don't have time to do the job anymore.

 

I used to think that ardent supporters of the right to bear weapons and stockpiling food and ammo were nuts. Not anymore.

 

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http://www.businessinsider.com/oakland-police-chief-threatens-to-cut-911-service-if-layoffs-go-as-planned-2010-7

 

The U.S. has been successful because of innovation and establishing the rule of law. If we get to a point where police officers don't even provide a basic sense of safety to citizens what is going to happen? These guys are threatening, but I think it is more than that since eventually you get down to a lower limit in workforce where you really don't have time to do the job anymore.

 

I used to think that ardent supporters of the right to bear weapons and stockpiling food and ammo were nuts. Not anymore.

 

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Anyone living unarmed in Oakland is nuts (even before this).

 

--Eric (gun nut), RKBAbang.com  I've never stockpiled food though.

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The list of occurrences seem to be after-the-fact reports of crimes against property.  I used to work, in a civilian admin capacity, for a Cdn city police force.  Most policing service requests (90 pct) are not in regard to criminal matters, and most of the criminal matters are crimes against property, and generally capable of being dealt with in non-emergency mode.  I think it probable that Oakland, as well as most other cities, is overwhelmed with non-emergency calls to 911.

 

Encouraging the public to use 911 calls only for genuine emergencies (ie "emerging", ie action right now is necessary to make a difference), is not a bad move.

 

It is far, far from needing to go "survivalist", either urban or rural.

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Encouraging the public to use 911 calls only for genuine emergencies (ie "emerging", ie action right now is necessary to make a difference), is not a bad move.

 

One time I wanted to report vandalism to my property, so I grabbed the phone book and looked up the number for my local police.  They listed 2 numbers, a "business" number for the police station and "emergency call 911".  I called the business number, got the police station, and was told to report a crime I had to hang up and dial 911. This is a small town, nothing like Oakland, so maybe the procedure is different elsewhere.

 

--Eric

 

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The chief is bluffing guys!  You're going to see more of this as cash-strapped states and municipalities have to make hard choices, and department heads have to pull this stuff to get some concessions.  We lived through all of this in the 70's...remember how bad things were in New York?  Miami in the 80's?  Los Angeles in the 90's?  Detroit today!  Cheers!

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I'm thinking of buying some property up north(middle of nowhere) in the event of something crazy going on.

 

Working in IT, I have seen a lot of unforeseen consequences.

 

American's don't seem to think that their government can handle heath care but have faith that their military can handle WMD's without accidents.

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I believe this is in response to Oakland's and BART's ongoing legal claims over the wrongful death of Oscar Grant.  Oakland is cash strapped, but that's not news.  It has been cash strapped WAY before this financial crisis ever hit.  The incoming legal settlements (one of which has already been settled to the tune of 1.5 million dollars) is what Oakland needs to contend with.  And what better way than by shutting down the instigators of their legal mess? 

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$1.5 million is cheap. The guy was shot execution style. Its unfortunate the city has to pay for it though.

It is slightly ironic that it comes full circle back to the police.

 

No doubt.  Although, that's just one claim.  There are, I believe, 4 or 5 more pending claims against the city.  I'm sure the city and Oakland PD has insurance policies to pay for the settlements; although, insurance companies are always trying to get out of paying these claims.

 

Well, I'm sure that Oakland PD was not looking to be in this situation.  I'm no police apologist, but I think that Merserhle made an honest, but severe, mistake.  He's in no way guilty of murder or voluntary manslaughter.  Also, what people don't realize is this occurred in Oakland where three police officers were killed in the past year.  That place is dangerous.

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I tend to give cops a pretty long piece of rope cause its a job that has to wear at your nerves but this situation was just plain awful.

 

I have to agree with you though, because shooting a restrained guy who is doing nothing just doesnt make much sense. It seems like its a huge mistake that he will have to pay for with a big chunk of his life. I didnt know about the other cases, it sounds like things are a real mess in Cali right now.

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There are no claims against the city of Oakland in the Oscar Grant wrongful death suit.  City police officers were not involved.  The suits are against the BART, a governmental transit agency, and various transit officers.  (BART settled with the daughter's lawyer for 1.5 million, the mother has a multi-million dollar suit outstanding.)

 

Regarding the unfortunate layoffs of police officers.  The police do not contribute anything to their pensions.  For any pension concessions,  i.e. make contributions to their retirement funds,  they wanted a guaranteed no layoff policy, which is impossible in California's current fiscal climate.  (Most counties and cities are going to have to cut even more in the next fiscal year.)

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There are no claims against the city of Oakland in the Oscar Grant wrongful death suit.  City police officers were not involved.  The suits are against the BART, a governmental transit agency, and various transit officers.  (BART settled with the daughter's lawyer for 1.5 million, the mother has a multi-million dollar suit outstanding.)

 

Regarding the unfortunate layoffs of police officers.  The police do not contribute anything to their pensions.  For any pension concessions,  i.e. make contributions to their retirement funds,  they wanted a guaranteed no layoff policy, which is impossible in California's current fiscal climate.  (Most counties and cities are going to have to cut even more in the next fiscal year.)

 

That's right.  Sorry about my misinformation.  BART is responsible and settling the score.  I keep forgetting that Oakland PD had nothing to do with the case except dealing with the aftermath. 

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