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CapIQ & FactSet Pricing?


rustler37
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Curious what the real market price is for FactSet and CapitalIQ.

 

FactSet is quoting me ~$13K/seat/year for their full workstation product (including StreetAccount)

 

CapIQ is quoting me ~$14K/year but it's for FIRM pricing (2-3 seats), they say they won't do per seat. 

 

I only need one seat -- anyone getting better single seat pricing from CapIQ?

 

Thanks

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Rocketfinancial loses a lot of credibility when the first thing I type in is Berkshire Hathaway (one of the largest large cap stocks in the world) and it lists market cap as:

 

Market cap: $328761 B

 

That is the real price from what I've heard, and CapIQ does usually want at least $40k per year before they bother with an account, so that sounds accurate as well. 

 

Take a look at http://www.rocketfinancial.com if you're looking for a free alternative.

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They just corrected it.  I copied and pasted the above from their site.

 

I looked up another company and the balance sheet was all wonky.  The problem with many of these type of sites is unclean data.  That's why people use bloomberg, and I assume now Capital IQ, the data is pretty clean either through human editing or a much better computerized data gathering system. 

 

edit - I wonder how the data is at this outfit:

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/18/business/dealbook/start-up-taking-aim-at-bloomberg-terminals-hires-former-bloomberg-head.html?_r=1

 

https://www.money.net

 

Market cap is listed as $419 B.  Looks right: http://www.rocketfinancial.com/Overview.aspx?fID=1058&pw=34872

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They just corrected it.  I copied and pasted the above from their site.

 

I looked up another company and the balance sheet was all wonky.  The problem with many of these type of sites is unclean data.  That's why people use bloomberg, and I assume now Capital IQ, the data is pretty clean either through human editing or a much better computerized data gathering system. 

 

edit - I wonder how the data is at this outfit:

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/18/business/dealbook/start-up-taking-aim-at-bloomberg-terminals-hires-former-bloomberg-head.html?_r=1

 

https://www.money.net

 

Market cap is listed as $419 B.  Looks right: http://www.rocketfinancial.com/Overview.aspx?fID=1058&pw=34872

 

Bloomberg has issues as well.  Everyone has issues, that's the nature of the data business.  Imagine collecting information from thousands of sources and trying to make sure they are all in the exact same format.  There is a reason data sells for a premium.  As someone who thought "I could do this myself" I've seen behind the curtain too. 

 

The SEC data is the lowest common denominator of data.  Everyone has tools on this stuff, it's easy to get and easy to write a parser.  I cranked out a .NET parser in two nights a few years ago as a test concept.  If I can do this then literally anyone who can code can do this.

 

The key is having:

a) data that isn't available elsewhere

b) digital versions of paper data

c) a network effect

 

If all you need is BRK's stats you're better off going to SEC.gov.  If you want bond prices for Angola you won't find it online..

 

As a side note, I recently cancelled my Bloomberg subs.  I realized I could get 90% of the information I need from Morningstar premium and Screener.co.  Together they cost less than a month on Bberg.

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Tried money.net.  It will likely get better over time but for now it's just a step up from google/yahoo finance.  CapIQ/Factset/Bloomberg a different level when it comes to data integrity, segment detail, street estimates, screening, historical valuation, etc. 

 

Still curious what people are actually paying for CapIQ/FactSet. 

 

Thanks!

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These are really great posts on what people use.  I really appreciate them.  I have been looking for good alternatives for awhile and hadn't known about some of these.  Seems to be a lot of room for sites since Yahoo finance stinks now.

I still like Morningstar the best for a quick overview of a companies financials. 

 

Value line is also great for a paper edition of a quick overview of a company.

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  • 1 year later...

Bloomberg is run off of Dunn & Broadstreet data - surprising right?

 

I believe that Yahoo runs off of Thomson Reuters. 

 

CapIQ does their own.

 

Not sure about Factset.

 

Bloomberg does their own as well.  They have a shop in Asia that manually inputs this stuff by hand.

 

SNL inputs by hand as well.

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  • 5 months later...

Does anyone who uses Rocket Financial know what the price is to add the International?  Thanks.

 

I know this is an old thread, but I recently asked about the RocketFinancial Excel Add-in and got the following reply:

 

The Excel add-in is part of a premium subscription (coming soon).  The subscription will allow for global fundamental data (60,000+ companies in 100+ countries), unlimited access, an Excel plug-in, and dedicated customer support.  The subscription will cost $500/month.  Discounted pricing is available for personal investors.

 

So it seems like the Add-in, at least, is still under development. Has anyone had a beta invite or signed up for International?

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