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Sugar is bad for you


merkhet
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Personally, I have stopped drinking soda totally.

 

However, for a vegetarian, it's hard to avoid sugars, overall carbohydrates, gluten, etc.

 

I ate one month gluten free. It was livable, but not a lot of fun and choice. Overall, I now try to limit gluten but I don't totally eliminate it.

 

In terms of sugar, I still eat too much I think: chocolate mostly, dried cranberries (with sugar).

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Personally, I have stopped drinking soda totally.

 

However, for a vegetarian, it's hard to avoid sugars, overall carbohydrates, gluten, etc.

 

I ate one month gluten free. It was livable, but not a lot of fun and choice. Overall, I now try to limit gluten but I don't totally eliminate it.

 

In terms of sugar, I still eat too much I think: chocolate mostly, dried cranberries (with sugar).

 

Just curious, why do you want to avoid gluten? It's not bad for you unless you have Celiac disease.

 

It's important to note that Coca Cola and other sodas sold in the U.S. don't contain the table sugar we're all familiar with. It contains high fructose corn syrup, which is far worse for you. If you want to drink healthier Coke, then buy the Mexican bottled one, which contains real sugar.

 

Sugar and carbs are of course an important part of a healthy diet so it's not necessary to cut down too much.

 

Btw I'm a vegetarian too.

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Just curious, why do you want to avoid gluten? It's not bad for you unless you have Celiac disease.

 

There are claims on both sides for this.

 

It's important to note that Coca Cola and other sodas sold in the U.S. don't contain the table sugar we're all familiar with. It contains high fructose corn syrup, which is far worse for you. If you want to drink healthier Coke, then buy the Mexican bottled one, which contains real sugar.

 

There are US sodas now that contain sugar.

 

Sugar and carbs are of course an important part of a healthy diet so it's not necessary to cut down too much.

 

As I've said in my message for vegetarian it is pretty impossible to cut them down too much. What would you be eating, grass? :)

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Personally, I have stopped drinking soda totally.

 

However, for a vegetarian, it's hard to avoid sugars, overall carbohydrates, gluten, etc.

 

I ate one month gluten free. It was livable, but not a lot of fun and choice. Overall, I now try to limit gluten but I don't totally eliminate it.

 

In terms of sugar, I still eat too much I think: chocolate mostly, dried cranberries (with sugar).

 

Just curious, why do you want to avoid gluten? It's not bad for you unless you have Celiac disease.

 

It's important to note that Coca Cola and other sodas sold in the U.S. don't contain the table sugar we're all familiar with. It contains high fructose corn syrup, which is far worse for you. If you want to drink healthier Coke, then buy the Mexican bottled one, which contains real sugar.

 

Sugar and carbs are of course an important part of a healthy diet so it's not necessary to cut down too much.

 

Btw I'm a vegetarian too.

 

There is not much evidence that table sugar is any better than corn syrup based sugar.  Table sugar is part fructose/part glucose.  The data around this whole issue is pretty sketchy, like most dietary research.  The problem is more to do with the pervasiveness of sugar(s) in processed foods these days.  The total amount of glucose/fructose consumed has skyrocketed from any earlier times. 

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After all that you've done for us in the FNMA/FMCC thread, I look forward to all your insight on this topic, Merkhet!

 

I have little to no insight on this topic other than to say that we should all probably be eating less sugar. In Jacobi-esque fashion, we could ask ourselves the question of "Should we be eating MORE sugar?" and then move backwards.

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Good way to reason, it would be good to hear from Paleo diet aficionados as I think it does include eating good quantity of fruits.

 

I guess is too much of anything is bad - including sugar or fats.

 

Ornish diet suggests low intake of sugars and fats to reverse heart disease. It is also clinically proven to work.

 

Surprisingly, eating potatos only helped this person reduce cholesterol and blood glucose levels.

 

http://www.20potatoesaday.com/

 

 

After all that you've done for us in the FNMA/FMCC thread, I look forward to all your insight on this topic, Merkhet!

 

I have little to no insight on this topic other than to say that we should all probably be eating less sugar. In Jacobi-esque fashion, we could ask ourselves the question of "Should we be eating MORE sugar?" and then move backwards.

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Personally, I have stopped drinking soda totally.

 

However, for a vegetarian, it's hard to avoid sugars, overall carbohydrates, gluten, etc.

 

I ate one month gluten free. It was livable, but not a lot of fun and choice. Overall, I now try to limit gluten but I don't totally eliminate it.

 

In terms of sugar, I still eat too much I think: chocolate mostly, dried cranberries (with sugar).

 

Just curious, why do you want to avoid gluten? It's not bad for you unless you have Celiac disease.

 

It's important to note that Coca Cola and other sodas sold in the U.S. don't contain the table sugar we're all familiar with. It contains high fructose corn syrup, which is far worse for you. If you want to drink healthier Coke, then buy the Mexican bottled one, which contains real sugar.

 

Sugar and carbs are of course an important part of a healthy diet so it's not necessary to cut down too much.

 

Btw I'm a vegetarian too.

 

There is not much evidence that table sugar is any better than corn syrup based sugar.  Table sugar is part fructose/part glucose.  The data around this whole issue is pretty sketchy, like most dietary research.  The problem is more to do with the pervasiveness of sugar(s) in processed foods these days.  The total amount of glucose/fructose consumed has skyrocketed from any earlier times.

 

Exactly. Try not to eat any of that shit on a regular basis and indulge once a week. Once you stop eating sugar/glucose/fructose and processed foods including bread, pasta, etc. you actually start tasting the natural sweetness of vegetables.

 

Also, for those who stopped drinking pop and are congratulating themselves, I hope you also stopped drinking fruit juice because that shit is just as bad for you - same amount of sugar. Instead drink water and eat whole fruit.

 

 

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Just waiting for that special hard core reader to come in here and brag they don't eat any sugar and subsist on rocks and dirt, but pure rocks and diet, none of that processed crap.

 

Anything in excess is bad, food in moderation is fine. But what is moderation?

 

Years ago I lived the classic unhealthy life. I ate too much, sat too much, ate out for lunch and felt like crap even thought I didn't know it at the time. I had a switch in my job where I could work at home. I started to eat less and work out, suddenly I was losing weight. Took about a year and lost 45 lbs that I've kept off. I was skinny and athletic up until I entered an office. I have a natural athletic inclination, I look at my overweight period as the anomaly.

 

Co-workers asked me what my secret was. There is no secret, hundreds of small life changes compounded over a year is the secret. It sucked, but it worked. I went from being hungry at first to being satisfied. I eat a lot less now and am fine. I eat better too, I love veggies and fruit. If I have some desire to pig out I will do it on that. I figure after a run if I eat a bag of radishes or two apples and a head of broccoli that I'm not doing my body much harm. 

 

A weird thing happened though. As my body reverted to normal I will now feel terrible if I don't eat properly. If we go out of town for a few days and the host only eats out or has junk in their house I feel miserable by the end of the weekend. My body will get kicked out of line by unhealthy food or too much of it. I still enjoy sweets but after more than a handful of Starburst or some other candy I will have a stomach ache. I don't think that's necessarily a bad thing, just self regulation at work.

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Just waiting for that special hard core reader to come in here and brag they don't eat any sugar and subsist on rocks and dirt, but pure rocks and diet, none of that processed crap.

 

Anything in excess is bad, food in moderation is fine. But what is moderation?

 

Years ago I lived the classic unhealthy life. I ate too much, sat too much, ate out for lunch and felt like crap even thought I didn't know it at the time. I had a switch in my job where I could work at home. I started to eat less and work out, suddenly I was losing weight. Took about a year and lost 45 lbs that I've kept off. I was skinny and athletic up until I entered an office. I have a natural athletic inclination, I look at my overweight period as the anomaly.

 

Co-workers asked me what my secret was. There is no secret, hundreds of small life changes compounded over a year is the secret. It sucked, but it worked. I went from being hungry at first to being satisfied. I eat a lot less now and am fine. I eat better too, I love veggies and fruit. If I have some desire to pig out I will do it on that. I figure after a run if I eat a bag of radishes or two apples and a head of broccoli that I'm not doing my body much harm. 

 

A weird thing happened though. As my body reverted to normal I will now feel terrible if I don't eat properly. If we go out of town for a few days and the host only eats out or has junk in their house I feel miserable by the end of the weekend. My body will get kicked out of line by unhealthy food or too much of it. I still enjoy sweets but after more than a handful of Starburst or some other candy I will have a stomach ache. I don't think that's necessarily a bad thing, just self regulation at work.

 

I totally agree.

 

The food we eat these days will kill you. There is so much corn-based sugar in it, if you take a bit of everything in moderation, its not moderate.

 

For me the best way to start was to 1) nail breakfast and 2) don't drink your calories (other than the odd beer and wine of course). Nailing breakfast to me is lots of protein (say at least 3 eggs, as protein calories make you feel more full), then lentils/beans potentially, and a veggie. Bread and cereal are junk food basically - and that's what most people eat and feed their kids. If I want junk, I'll do it right with some Lindt chocolate.

 

1) and 2) should get you maybe 40% of the way there and its pretty easy. You are at home, you can eat breakfast the way you want to no matter what the day brings.

 

 

 

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Good way to reason, it would be good to hear from Paleo diet aficionados as I think it does include eating good quantity of fruits.

 

I guess is too much of anything is bad - including sugar or fats.

 

Ornish diet suggests low intake of sugars and fats to reverse heart disease. It is also clinically proven to work.

 

Surprisingly, eating potatos only helped this person reduce cholesterol and blood glucose levels.

 

http://www.20potatoesaday.com/

 

 

After all that you've done for us in the FNMA/FMCC thread, I look forward to all your insight on this topic, Merkhet!

 

I have little to no insight on this topic other than to say that we should all probably be eating less sugar. In Jacobi-esque fashion, we could ask ourselves the question of "Should we be eating MORE sugar?" and then move backwards.

 

 

Having spent more than a few years studying healthy eating, observing the healthiest people on the planet and publishing books on those observations, the best advice is simple: eat whole grains, fruits and vegetables.

 

Repeat.

 

The more of these you eat, the better your health, the trimmer your body, the clearer your mind and the longer your disease free enjoyable life will be.

 

Make a list of foods you like in these categories and start eating more of them. They will fill you up, and you will find yourself consuming less of other things. As you intentionally eat increasingly more whole grains, vegetables and fruits, your enjoyment of them will grow.

 

The results of the 20 potatoes a day diet are not surprising. The English noticed in the mid 1800's how much healthier poor Irish immigrants were than the more affluent English, and how tall and beautiful the Irish women were.  The Irish seemed to eat nothing but inexpensive potatoes.

 

As an experiment, Two Englishmen volunteered to eat nothing but potatoes for six months. Afterwards, they were examined by medical doctors and determined to be in perfect health. They had neither lost nor gained weight. (That was in an era when most people, who had an active lifestyle, were not overweight)

 

However, there was a big problem in coming off the diet: The subjects had not only adapted to the all potatoes diet, but strongly preferred it. They no longer craved or missed any of the other food they gave up!

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I think what is far more important for people in Western society is exercise. If you look up the diets of people in the past, they ate tons of sugar and carbs. You have societies that primarily consumed carbs (ex: potatoes or rice) because protein was expensive and scarce. It only becomes a problem when people sit for more than half of the day. In today's society, it is very easy to end up sitting for 12+ hours a day (8 hours at work, 2 hours driving in car to/from work, 2 hours at home). People end up with very little muscle mass on their body, so they cannot use up the carbs that they eat. A lot of people don't look fat. They eat a lot of salads. They look very nice with their clothes on. But they actually have far higher body fat percentage than they realize because they have very little muscle mass. When these guys consume a little extra carbs, it can still bring their blood sugar up.

 

I think for those people who work in an office, it is extremely important to hit the gym and lift some heavy weights. You can't let you muscle mass atrophy away, because then your metabolism would go way down as there is no lean mass to sustain and you will end up with "too many carbs" even though you eat very little. You have to undo the damage of sitting for an extended period of time.

 

Different body types have different dietary needs. People have started viewing sugar and carbs as the plague because their lifestyle caused them to have bodies (either too fat and/or too little lean mass) that can't use much of it any more. If you look at the Asian American population, diabetes have suddenly become a major problem (significantly higher than average) because they prefer to eat so much rice or noodles. Their ancestors ate the same diets for thousands of years and they had very long lifespans. It's not that carbs suddenly became bad. It's their body chemistry that has changed because of disuse and sitting around all day.

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When my wife and I get in a "food rut" and both start feeling crappy, we like to watch Morgan Spurlock's documentary Supersize Me.

 

For those who haven't seen or heard of it, he eats only McDonalds for 30 days.

At the end of the show in the doctors office, he gives a visual of the sugar he's consumed based on the Coke and milkshakes. (One stipulation of his plan was to agree to supersize the combo when asked, if he wasn't asked by the cashier then he had their normal size) So for most of the lunches and dinners he was taking in close to a litre of Coke. That worked out to 30lbs of sugar over the month.

 

I've also been trying to kick the sugar habit for a while. The biggest thing for me is the coffee. I typically have 5-6 a day but a couple are from Tim Horton's and they use a Sure Shot for sugar.

That's a measured system used so every cup gets the same ratio of sugar. It's not teaspoons, it's a ratio based on a small coffee so each coffee taste similar no matter the size.

 

A large coffee at Tim Hortons with 2 sugars is actually 24 grams. And that's straight from their website.

 

A couple of years ago we ran out of sugar at home. I didn't want to make a trip to just get sugar so I went without sugar for a couple of days. I also didn't have any Coke for those days (just a coincidence, it wasn't planned). After one day I noticed how much better my breathing was. I wasn't aware I was having problems until I stopped the sugar and Coke. It seems I needed a deep breath every couple of minutes and even my normal breathing was somewhat deep.

After a day my breathing was pretty calm and I didn't feel the need for deep a breath at all.

 

After looking it up I found that sugar is one of the largest contributors to inflammation in some people.

Apparently I'm one of them.

 

 

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Twacowfca,

Have you read [amazonsearch]Brain Grain[/amazonsearch] by doctor Perlmutter?

 

If so, what's your thought on it?

 

Thank you!

 

Gio

 

Yes, I read almost all the popular diet books.  The problem with their concepts is that observations are usually based on what happens in a population with a lifestyle and diet that is very different than what our ancestors experienced only a few generations ago.

 

Imagine how erroneous our ideas about mental health would be if those thoughts were formulated by experiences and interventions among the population of an insane asylum. We might conclude that we could all benefit by taking antipsychotic drugs.

 

If one sits all day and eats whole grain bagels made with fine flour with twenty times as much gluten as primative cultivars of wheat had, that would not be healthy.

 

The benefits of eating whole grains are not equivalent to eating many so called whole grain products.

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Twacowfca,

Have you read [amazonsearch]Brain Grain[/amazonsearch] by doctor Perlmutter?

 

If so, what's your thought on it?

 

Thank you!

 

Gio

 

Yes, I read almost all the popular diet books.  The problem with their concepts is that observations are usually based on what happens in a population with a lifestyle and diet that is very different than what our ancestors experienced only a few generations ago.

 

Imagine how erroneous our ideas about mental health would be if those thoughts were formulated by experiences and interventions among the population of an insane asylum. We might conclude that we could all benefit by taking antipsychotic drugs.

 

If one sits all day and eats whole grain bagels made with fine flour with twenty times as much gluten as primative cultivars of wheat had, that would not be healthy.

 

The benefits of eating whole grains are not equivalent to eating many so called whole grain products.

 

Interesting... so what are true whole grain products and where does one buy them?

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Good way to reason, it would be good to hear from Paleo diet aficionados as I think it does include eating good quantity of fruits.

 

I guess is too much of anything is bad - including sugar or fats.

 

Ornish diet suggests low intake of sugars and fats to reverse heart disease. It is also clinically proven to work.

 

Surprisingly, eating potatos only helped this person reduce cholesterol and blood glucose levels.

 

http://www.20potatoesaday.com/

 

 

After all that you've done for us in the FNMA/FMCC thread, I look forward to all your insight on this topic, Merkhet!

 

I have little to no insight on this topic other than to say that we should all probably be eating less sugar. In Jacobi-esque fashion, we could ask ourselves the question of "Should we be eating MORE sugar?" and then move backwards.

 

I guess I eat pretty close to primal/paleo. Usually the fruits I eat are berries (straw, blue, and raspberry). Then in the summer toss in peaches as they grow about a mile from my house.

 

This kind explains the fruit to eat better: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/best-and-worst-fruits/

 

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