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How to Learn - An outstanding presentation


vinod1
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For those you with kids in middle/school or going to college, there is an outstanding presentation by a fellow board member (boilermaker75). The best 20 minutes you can spend on improving study skills.

 

 

Vinod

 

Thanks for a nice reinforcement of a skill I've been working on recently.

 

I've found that memory can be superficial or it can be deep.

 

I can usually memorize a musical piece fairly quickly but have found that when I play it in a performance environment,

recital or jury, there are issues with recall.

 

I've been focusing on learning things quickly instead of learning them deeply. Fortunately, I've been able to develop

enough composure to play through mistakes while maintaining tempo.

 

Over the semester break, I read a book called the Musicians Way & the author spent time discussing

the subject of superficial vs deep learning.

 

It's just as your video outlines.

 

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Goal - Play a piece from memory under stressful conditions.

 

Focus - Learn a phrase at a time. For difficult passages, concentrate on a single measure at a time within the piece.

 

Feedback - Get instructor guidance on articulation & making improvements in dynamics & expression.

 

Comfort zone - gradually increase the tempo & try to read while playing instead of just playing from memory.

 

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I highly recommend music, and specifically performance, to anyone interested in improving memory skills.

Performance can be simply playing for / with family & friends & it adds stress which tests your memory.

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Reminds me of NBA players and shooting the ball. In practice some of these guys put away shots with 95+% accuracy, in game conditions this drops significantly. Occurs even for un-defended shots such as free throws.

 

They are constantly devising methods to better transfer practice knowledge to game time situations, i.e. 'meaningful practice'.

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Reminds me of NBA players and shooting the ball. In practice some of these guys put away shots with 95+% accuracy, in game conditions this drops significantly. Occurs even for un-defended shots such as free throws.

 

They are constantly devising methods to better transfer practice knowledge to game time situations, i.e. 'meaningful practice'.

 

Exactly.

 

It's largely because we're worried about making a mistake & disappointing an audience.

 

When a player focuses instead on the enjoyment of the game, their performance will flow & they'll easily adapt when mistakes are made.

 

Few people in the audience will even notice small errors.

 

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edit: do it for your own enjoyment & anyone watching will come along for the ride.

 

I'm going to watch this video again this afternoon.

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Guest oakwood42

For those you with kids in middle/school or going to college, there is an outstanding presentation by a fellow board member (boilermaker75). The best 20 minutes you can spend on improving study skills.

 

 

Vinod

 

Great video - currently studying for level 2 cfa very helpful!

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  • 2 weeks later...

For those of you with kids, the most important thing you can do is instill a growth mindset, which I discuss in part 5.

 

Here's Drew Brees doing that on national TV when he tells his kids "You can accomplish anything in life if

you are willing to work for it."

 

 

Thank you for making the video. I was looking for this thread for days and I now I finally found it. Great content.

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Completed going over the 6 videos and I would recommend all of them. In these short videos, Mike has summarized the best available research on the subject in a concise and interesting way.

 

I read the book Mindset, took notes, tried to summarize it for my son and I think got through to him. But in the video, Mike has done a far better job of it and easier for kids to go through.

 

Thanks again Mike. Really enjoyed all of them.

 

Vinod

 

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Completed going over the 6 videos and I would recommend all of them. In these short videos, Mike has summarized the best available research on the subject in a concise and interesting way.

 

I read the book Mindset, took notes, tried to summarize it for my son and I think got through to him. But in the video, Mike has done a far better job of it and easier for kids to go through.

 

Thanks again Mike. Really enjoyed all of them.

 

Vinod

 

Vinod,

 

I am glad you found them useful. I'm working on a new version, which hopefully will be a little better organized and more clearly presented, that I will be taping the end of February.

 

Mike

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Kind of an unrelated question:

 

Have there been any studies or literature on the threshold after which the brain becomes overwhelmed and incorrectly assigns the same or similar items as "random"? I am wording this question poorly; let me give an example:

 

Let's say you put on headphones and listen to brief (3-4 second) jungle sounds, one after the other. A tiger roar, a monkey screech, a bird call, a waterfall, an insect sound, etc. etc etc etc. And maybe some of these are slightly different, e.g. a tiger roaring loudly, a tiger purring softly, and so on.

 

When is the point where we hear the same sound two or three times, but can't distinguish or remember that we've heard it before? Is it after 10 sounds? 20? 50?

 

Just wondering if anyone has seen any type of literature on this or related topics.

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