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US China Manufacturing Story Resonates


DooDiligence
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I picked up a used 2015 Kenny Hill Estudio series classical (low end Chinese model) & have been playing it for a week now.

 

You could spend a lot more money for a lot less guitar (incredibly beautiful instrument too.)

 

The founder gives an interesting & detailed account of how he accomplished this.

 

http://www.hillguitar.com/website/news/articles/china.html

 

---

 

This article says they make around 150 guitars per year in the US & 50K a year in China.

 

http://www.mercurynews.com/2013/01/04/made-in-the-bay-area-hill-guitars-low-tech-product-belies-the-complexities-of-modern-manufacturing/

 

---

 

For now there are NONE on Amazon & very few on eBay.

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  • 1 month later...

This is - to me - just so awesome.

 

A fellow board member [absolutely hell bent], pursuing own dreams, for life fullfillment.

 

I wish you all the best, DooDiligence.

 

I just saw this.

 

Thanks John!

 

What's your favorite song?

I'll work out an arrangement & dedicate it to you.

(Disclaimer: may take up to a year as I'm friggin' swamped right now, but it will be done.)

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This is - to me - just so awesome.

 

A fellow board member [absolutely hell bent], pursuing own dreams, for life fullfillment.

 

I wish you all the best, DooDiligence.

 

I just saw this.

 

Thanks John!

 

What's your favorite song?

I'll work out an arrangement & dedicate it to you.

(Disclaimer: may take up to a year as I'm friggin' swamped right now, but it will be done.)

 

After a lot of thinking - during several days: Are you serious about this, DooDiligence?

 

[Edit: Somehow, I suppose DooDiligence is used to this question - as a [retired]  sailor - so, it's all about me, and my own safety ...] And No!, this is not the place to laugh!

 

Yes, I've found something very special to&for you. Willing to proceed?

 

It's a song about love.

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This is - to me - just so awesome.

 

A fellow board member [absolutely hell bent], pursuing own dreams, for life fullfillment.

 

I wish you all the best, DooDiligence.

 

I just saw this.

 

Thanks John!

 

What's your favorite song?

I'll work out an arrangement & dedicate it to you.

(Disclaimer: may take up to a year as I'm friggin' swamped right now, but it will be done.)

 

After a lot of thinking - during several days: Are you serious about this, DooDiligence?

 

[Edit: Somehow, I suppose DooDiligence is used to this question - as a [retired]  sailor - so, it's all about me, and my own safety ...] And No!, this is not the place to laugh!

 

Yes, I've found something very special to&for you. Willing to proceed?

 

It's a song about love.

 

Hit me baby (I hope it's classical so I don't destroy my nails. If it's not, I'll re-arrange & lounge it out.)

 

I'm presently only working on Lonesome Stranger (crushing on EC fingerstyle) outside of the classroom & will put it in the cue (may take a while as stated before.)

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Here we go, DooDiligence,

 

I really hope that this does not overshoot, and that it - somehow - fits your style and taste. Personally, I think that ie. Dolly Parton would really like it and perhaps even try to pick it up, if she was still active.

 

Song:

. [Actually two songs in that clip, it's the second one, which starts at 0:33.]

Chords: Here

Text [in Danish]: Here.[<- The name of the website translates to "The Library Guard"]

 

The music instrument is here an accordion, I imagine it would be awesome with a guitar as instrument, too.

 

- - - o 0 o - - -

 

I'll elaborate some more later!

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Here we go, DooDiligence,

 

I really hope that this does not overshoot, and that it - somehow - fits your style and taste. Personally, I think that ie. Dolly Parton would really like it and perhaps even try to pick it up, if she was still active.

 

Song:

. [Actually two songs in that clip, it's the second one, whoich starts at 0:33.]

Chords: Here

Text [in Danish]: Here.[<- The name of the website translates to "The Library Guard"]

 

The music instrument is here an accordion, I imagine it would be awesome with a guitar as instrument, too.

 

- - - o 0 o - - -

 

I'll elaborate some more later!

 

Easy peasy!

 

BTW, RiffStation is an awesome website (thanks.)

 

Be patient, I'm jammed up right now, but it will be done & videoed.

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DooDiligence,

 

I'm happy that you like it! I'll naturally translate the song text to English for you [-otherwise you'll most likely kill me if I listen to your work! lol] The Lady of the House accually has a combined economics & language education [languages english & german], so I'll ask her to provide some fine tuning of my best shot translation.

 

- - - o 0 o - - -

 

I'll still elaborate some more later! - And please, by all means, just take your time! - I have no intention to die tomorrow. [That may be subject to change though - I'm considering to load up on the Big Four US banks ...]

 

- - - o 0 o - - -

 

How about chords, DooDiligence? -I mean, can you read such things? They make absolutely no sense to me ...

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DooDiligence,

 

I'm happy that you like it! I'll naturally translate the song text to English for you [-otherwise you'll most likely kill me if I listen to your work! lol] The Lady of the House accually has a combined economics & language education [languages english & german], so I'll ask her to provide some fine tuning of my best shot translation.

 

- - - o 0 o - - -

 

I'll still elaborate some more later! - And please, by all means, just take your time! - I have no intention to die tomorrow. [That may be subject to change though - I'm considering to load up on the Big Four US banks ...]

 

- - - o 0 o - - -

 

How about chords, DooDiligence? -I mean, can you read such things? They make absolutely no sense to me ...

 

Those are in tab, which I can read (and they give the letter chord, for a fuller understanding of what you're playing.)

If they were written on a staff, I'd need another year to be able to follow them.

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  • 3 months later...

Hi Jeff,

 

It appears, that I was willing to load up on the four big US banks in January this year. ... -Well, sometimes things and opinons just change. [it's now down to three.]

 

Somehow, I consider this topic your personal sandbox topic here on CoBF.

 

- - - o 0 o - - -

 

Congrats on your exams! -That's just awesome!

 

- - - o 0 o - - -

 

Also I just want here to express my understanding of you not being particular active here on CoBF ATM. Life isen't easy, when it gives you lemons. I just hope that you're [so-so] OK. [it will fit you well, if you aren't, actually.]

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Hi Jeff,

 

It appears, that I was willing to load up on the four big US banks in January this year. ... -Well, sometimes things and opinons just change. [it's now down to three.]

 

Somehow, I consider this topic your personal sandbox topic here on CoBF.

 

- - - o 0 o - - -

 

Congrats on your exams! -That's just awesome!

 

- - - o 0 o - - -

 

Also I just want here to express my understanding of you not being particular active here on CoBF ATM. Life isen't easy, when it gives you lemons. I just hope that you're [so-so] OK. [it will fit you well, if you aren't, actually.]

 

Thanks John!

 

I am alive and well and reading music written on traditional manuscript paper took less time to learn than I thought.

(Working through some waltzes right now, and finding out that I'm not super crazy about waltzes.)

 

Back on topic: I'll be going with my fellow PSC guitar majors to the Guitar Foundation of America (GFA) competition in Louisiville, KY this coming June.

 

http://www.guitarfoundation.org

 

Kenny Hill of Hill Guitar (from the article this thread is about) will be there along with a lot of other luthiers.

Their Chinese made Estudio model is my favorite instrument and gets more play time than any other.

 

I'm also looking forward to meeting some of the guys from Godin.

They made my La Patrie Etude, which is my 2nd favorite (a very nice Canadian made classical guitar.)

I like that it uses a non-traditional tone wood (Wild Cherry) for the back & sides (laminate) & has a solid Canadian cedar top.

They claim to produce these by hand (anyone live near them in Quebec?)

 

http://www.godinguitars.com

http://www.lapatrieguitars.com

 

The GFA competition is a great chance for anyone who's interested in trying out a lot of different instruments without having to drive all over hell's half acre to do it (not that driving all over hells half acre wouldn't be fun, because it would, but all in one place is nice too.)

 

---

 

As an aside, I've been posting less because I've been busy as shit with school but even more importantly, I noticed that I have a higher post count than many here who contribute wayyy more to financial discussions (globalfinancepartners for one) and I need to slow it down & start listening to my betters a bit more.

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  • 8 months later...

Jeff,

 

I saw your grades on Twitter for second half 2018! - Congrats!

 

-Please tell us some more about why the guitar [which I perceive as your primary] is some kind of a challenge for you, while at the same time, the piano is just some kind of breeze for you! Personally as a non-musician, I can't comprehend why it is so! [To me, it seems like both instruments are about touching something, to get a tone.]

 

- - - o 0 o - - -

 

Attached is the 2017 annual report of a very a successful Danish company living by providing joy to customers. Please don't take it too seriously - I'm confident you'll do well! Please think of it more like Mr. Buffett's promise to himself never to change the name of what he has called his biggest mistake - to never forget! - Just in case you later choose to incorporate!

offentliggorelse_Down_the_Drain_Holding_ApS_2017.pdf

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Jeff,

 

I saw your grades on Twitter for second half 2018! - Congrats!

 

-Please tell us some more about why the guitar [which I perceive as your primary] is some kind of a challenge for you, while at the same time, the piano is just some kind of breeze for you! Personally as a non-musician, I can't comprehend why it is so! [To me, it seems like both instruments are about touching something, to get a tone.]

 

- - - o 0 o - - -

 

Attached is the 2017 annual report of a very a successful Danish company living by providing joy to customers. Please don't take it too seriously - I'm confident you'll do well! Please think of it more like Mr. Buffett's promise to himself never to change the name of what he has called his biggest mistake - to never forget! - Just in case you later choose to incorporate!

 

Thanks for the link to Down the Drain.

These guys do a ton of shows.

Might be a nice source for work after I graduate.

 

---

 

Classical guitar is extremely picky.

It's too formal & performances are lifeless (to me.)

 

You are required to play sitting down with your left leg raised up on a foot stool.

I play standing up with a strap & don't enjoy playing while sitting.

 

Classical guitar also requires a LOT of practice which I'm not willing to do (I'd rather practice piano.)

I want the best grades possible & to make more progress on the piano (there's only so many hours in the day.)

Progress on the piano is much quicker, although the instrument is by no means easy to master.

 

I still play guitar for at least an hour a day but I play what I want to play, and how I want to play it.

 

Even though I don't like playing classical guitar, I now prefer nylon stringed guitars over steel strings.

The nut is wider & the strings don't tear my fingernails up.

I've always played "finger-style" & almost never use a pick.

Haven't touched a steel string in a while.

 

Incidentally, I also prefer playing keyboard standing up but sitting doesn't bother me.

My piano at home is set up so that I play standing up, and I sit for lessons & when practicing at school.

My technique is the same either standing or sitting.

 

With classical guitar you have to sit in order to generate consistent tone.

It's all about developing muscle memory so your fingers strike the strings exactly the same way every time (bah...)

I find it uncomfortable.

 

This is all about having fun & the piano is fun regardless of the musical genre.

Playing popular music with a guitar strapped on is fun.

 

Classical guitar bores the crap out of me.

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My son is currently learning “Child’s Anthem“ from Toto. Great song to play on a piano:

 

How old is your son?

Is he taking lessons?

 

If he has a good ear, he's ahead of the game.

If he really enjoys it & might continue playing throughout his life I recommend learning the following (at a minimum):

 

1. all the Major & minor scales (each key uses different pitch content).

2. understand how Major & minor keys relate to one another & how to switch modes.

3. understand how to transpose keys to accommodate different vocal ranges.

4. learn about triads & 7th chords & the different positions (jazz is big on inverted 7ths & builds improv skills).

5. understand the difference between simple & compound rhythms & how to divide & subdivide beats.

 

These skills will VASTLY improve his abilities.

 

Later on, I recommend Ear Training which will teach him how to recognize intervals (the space between 2 notes.)

This will lead to the ability to hear a melody / harmony & be able to get the pitches & chords more accurately.

 

https://www.earmaster.com

 

Ear training also focuses on rhythmic elements which are easy enough to simply hear, memorize & imitate, and being able to see it written out & interpret the rhythm is to me more challenging than identifying pitches.

 

None of this is truly necessary & many keyboardists simply learn finger patterns & watch YouTube videos to learn songs but if you want to be able to write (and copyright the work) and collaborate with top notch talent, these are foundational skills.

 

---

 

ATM I'm working on Spooky by the Atlanta Rhythm Section.

 

 

---

 

Is our young cellist (MarkS) hear/here?

Fretless stringed instruments are super challenging.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Here Jeff's playing the first page - work in progress, I suppose - of a self-composed waltz [supposedly called "Trump Walls" [<- [ : - ) ]] on piano [<-? - I don't know the exact name of such a play-thingy - looks electrical to me].

 

I'll be composing classical pieces under the pseudonym Maad A.S. Föch

 

The keyboard is a Yamaha P115 which is a good entry level instrument but it's not real durable.

I'm already starting to get some clicking in the keys after not quite a year of heavy use.

 

This is what you get for $600 or so & it came with a nice stand, a bench that I never use & a cheap sustain pedal which I replaced immediately.

 

I'm learning to be more gentle with the keys but at 1st I'm just so damn glad to be able to make a long shift & grab big chords that I hammer the hell out of them. My instructor says being heavy handed at first is normal. I'm working on dynamics & hand balance now.

 

As I get better I'll pony up for something which is more substantially constructed & has more voices & built in effects but this Yamaha is sufficient for practice & should hold me for another 6 months.

 

This weekend I'll Tweet J.S. Bach's Minuet in G Major, one of Beethovens German Dances & maybe my crappy rendition of the Beatles "Let it Be" with even crappier vocals.

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My son is currently learning “Child’s Anthem“ from Toto. Great song to play on a piano:

 

How old is your son?

Is he taking lessons?

 

If he has a good ear, he's ahead of the game.

If he really enjoys it & might continue playing throughout his life I recommend learning the following (at a minimum):

 

1. all the Major & minor scales (each key uses different pitch content).

2. understand how Major & minor keys relate to one another & how to switch modes.

3. understand how to transpose keys to accommodate different vocal ranges.

4. learn about triads & 7th chords & the different positions (jazz is big on inverted 7ths & builds improv skills).

5. understand the difference between simple & compound rhythms & how to divide & subdivide beats.

 

These skills will VASTLY improve his abilities.

 

Later on, I recommend Ear Training which will teach him how to recognize intervals (the space between 2 notes.)

This will lead to the ability to hear a melody / harmony & be able to get the pitches & chords more accurately.

 

https://www.earmaster.com

 

Ear training also focuses on rhythmic elements which are easy enough to simply hear, memorize & imitate, and being able to see it written out & interpret the rhythm is to me more challenging than identifying pitches.

 

None of this is truly necessary & many keyboardists simply learn finger patterns & watch YouTube videos to learn songs but if you want to be able to write (and copyright the work) and collaborate with top notch talent, these are foundational skills.

 

---

 

ATM I'm working on Spooky by the Atlanta Rhythm Section.

 

 

---

 

Is our young cellist (MarkS) hear/here?

Fretless stringed instruments are super challenging.

 

I'm here/hear dude.  Man do I need ear training!  I was at a lesson this afternoon  - all i heard was higher/lower (on the finger board). Would that software work for a crappy cellist?

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My son is currently learning “Child’s Anthem“ from Toto. Great song to play on a piano:

 

How old is your son?

Is he taking lessons?

 

If he has a good ear, he's ahead of the game.

If he really enjoys it & might continue playing throughout his life I recommend learning the following (at a minimum):

 

1. all the Major & minor scales (each key uses different pitch content).

2. understand how Major & minor keys relate to one another & how to switch modes.

3. understand how to transpose keys to accommodate different vocal ranges.

4. learn about triads & 7th chords & the different positions (jazz is big on inverted 7ths & builds improv skills).

5. understand the difference between simple & compound rhythms & how to divide & subdivide beats.

 

These skills will VASTLY improve his abilities.

 

Later on, I recommend Ear Training which will teach him how to recognize intervals (the space between 2 notes.)

This will lead to the ability to hear a melody / harmony & be able to get the pitches & chords more accurately.

 

https://www.earmaster.com

 

Ear training also focuses on rhythmic elements which are easy enough to simply hear, memorize & imitate, and being able to see it written out & interpret the rhythm is to me more challenging than identifying pitches.

 

None of this is truly necessary & many keyboardists simply learn finger patterns & watch YouTube videos to learn songs but if you want to be able to write (and copyright the work) and collaborate with top notch talent, these are foundational skills.

 

---

 

ATM I'm working on Spooky by the Atlanta Rhythm Section.

 

 

---

 

Is our young cellist (MarkS) hear/here?

Fretless stringed instruments are super challenging.

 

I'm here/hear dude.  Man do I need ear training!  I was at a lesson this afternoon  - all i heard was higher/lower (on the finger board). Would that software work for a crappy cellist?

 

It sounds like you're serious about this & I'd recommend checking your local community colleges to see if they have a music program.

If so, they'll probably offer a "Fundamentals of Music" course which you can audit.

 

In one semester they'll teach you how to read musical notation, work with key signatures (I've attached a copy of the circle of 5ths), & understand intervals (the distances between 2 pitches).

 

You will also find that taking piano at the same time will supercharge your understanding of these fundamentals since the keyboard has all the pitches laid out in a straight line which helps to better visualize what's going on.

 

---

 

After one semester, you'll be better equipped to do your own ear training with one of the following programs:

 

http://www.teoria.com/en/exercises/ie.php

 

I used this one a little bit but didn't spend a whole lot of time because I'm following a syllabus that involves MacGamut.

 

---

 

https://www.earmaster.com

 

I've never used this one but the demo presents a much better UI than MacGamut.

 

---

 

We use MacGamut at school.

The UI is garbage & it's really clunky.

It's also very difficult & requires an understanding of the fundamentals of music.

I'd recommend trying one of the other links above mainly because of the UI.

 

---

 

Remember that ear training & music in general are difficult & WILL be frustrating.

You must forge on & FAIL, FAIL, FAIL a lot but if you do this, you will begin to make progress.

The results are immensely satisfying for a music lover.

 

I highly recommend taking a fundamentals course & piano lessons.

You'll be able to apply what you learn to the cello while you're taking lessons for both instruments.

 

The piano is such an important tool to help lock in musical concepts that all music majors are required to demonstrate piano proficiency whether they intend to continue playing it or not (see attachment.) It also helps you to train your ears.

 

Personally, I find it to be a wonderful instrument & will continue to play it & the guitar forever.

Interval_Spelling_Cheat_Sheet.pdf

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Attached are 2 lists of tunes which contain familiar intervals.

The 1st list is a basic cheat sheet & the 2nd list includes a little more info.

 

For instance, the 1st 2 notes of "Here Comes the Bride" make up a perfect 4th.

 

This is helpful when you know what a perfect 4th looks like on a written piece of music so that you'll know what it's supposed to sound like.

 

Acquiring the skills of "audiation" enable you to sight read more quickly & to accurately "ear" out pieces without sheet music.

 

6ths & 7ths are the hardest for me.

Featured_Intervals.pdf

Interval_Singing.pdf

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Another equally important aspect is rhythm reading.

 

You have simple meters

 

2/4 = simple duple meter

3/4 = simple triple meter

4/4 = simple quadruple meter

 

and compound meters

 

6/8 = compound duple

9/8 = compound triple

12/8 = compound quadruple

 

We start out by clapping a particular written, straight line rhythm (no pitches are included).

Next you do what's called conducting & intoning (see attachment for conducting patterns).

Use the neutral syllable "ta" for intonation & vocally reproduce the exact note value in terms of duration & position within each pulse.

 

Compound & syncopated are the hardest to read & interpret.

Syncopation is where the pulse hits on a weak part of the beat.

 

1 e and A

2 E and a

3 e AND A

 

instead of falling directly on a down beat.

 

This was very challenging for me & I didn't get it until the very end of last semester.

Up till then I looked like Steve Martin in the opening credits of the Jerk.

 

 

Steve progresses throughout the above clip & so did I.

You will too & you have to be shameless & fearless in order to get there.

 

See attachments for a simplification of simple & compound meters to get you started.

Simple_Meter_Explained_Front.thumb.jpg.ae5685784122c203dc5a13f42480f840.jpg

Compound_Meter_Explained_Front.thumb.jpg.1d5da3d00596e1f96b83eda2577e0038.jpg

conducting_patterns.png.9c3a4ef723a431cd0cd85e672fee36dd.png

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Thanks so much Doo!  You're the best!

 

You're very welcome & I'll never be the best but I plan on always being better than the day before.

 

My Sight Singing & Ear Training instructor usually starts us off with

 

"Come on kids, shameless & fearless. Now blow my hair back!"

 

---

 

A huge advantage of being in a classroom setting is that you have a bunch of other goofballs who have varying levels of skill & lack of skill & we all support each other.

 

This differs from music programs at major universities where the instructors will haze the crap out of students to weed out the weak ones.

 

Community college is more inclusive & if you aren't already badassed, that's where to start.

I'm finding the instruction to be very good & the professors all want us to succeed.

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  • 1 year later...

Copied from the "Corona Virus" topic - today [perhaps grabbing it out of context, - one never really know] :

 

Make piss out of lemons much?

 

Members here at CoBF goes by their handle, or what ever - over time  - is available - here on CoBF.

 

Jeff,

 

Amazing to receive a personal & private message from you, about to find & gain focus & strength, exactly when it was most needed.

 

Now I revert exactly the same message to you, that you've send to me.

 

Take care.

 

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