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Any Female Humanities Majors Here?


cobafdek
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Just curious.

 

The stereotypical board member here is a male engineer.  Any non-male non-engineers?  Such as a female whose weekday job is acting in Shakespeare repertory or teaching Miguel de Cervantes in Spanish, but kicks back on the weekend relaxing by reading 10-Ks or engaging in a probabilistic search for low P/B, low P/E cigar butts?

 

Is this message board one of those haystacks without a needle?  If so, this thread might set the record for fewest number of replies.

 

 

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Suggestion: You probably should've created a poll where it's possible to anonymously vote. Most online communities treat women badly, or at least differently, so it's often much easier for women to not have feminized screen names and don't mention that they're women.

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Good point. Will do.

 

Most online communities treat women badly, or at least differently, so it's often much easier for women to not have feminized screen names and don't mention that they're women.

 

Sad commentary for society in general.  I think if there were such women here, such minds must be extraordinary and fascinating.

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Good point. Will do.

 

Most online communities treat women badly, or at least differently, so it's often much easier for women to not have feminized screen names and don't mention that they're women.

 

Sad commentary for society in general.  I think if there were such women here, such minds must be extraordinary and fascinating.

 

And with returns we would be envious of!

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Suggestion: You probably should've created a poll where it's possible to anonymously vote. Most online communities treat women badly, or at least differently, so it's often much easier for women to not have feminized screen names and don't mention that they're women.

 

Speaking from experience, Liberty?  ;)

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Speaking from experience, Liberty?  ;)

 

Sadly, yes. But thankfully for me, not my experience; the experience of others.

 

As a white male I've had it pretty easy in many ways, but lately I've tried to become more sensitive to the experience of others as they live it rather than just as I think it must be for them. I think too many men look at how terrible sexism was in the past and think "things have improved so much, it can't be that bad...". But in 50 years we'll look back to today and cringe massively.

 

I hang in many tech circles and I've seen it there, but never paid a lot of attention to it until recently when I listened to some podcasts from female game developers who talk about their experience and things like that. I started following @everydaysexism on twitter to kind of passively exposed myself a bit to that reality since I don't live it myself, to try to make myself more sensitive to it and be part of the solution rather than the problem (most well-intentioned people are part of the problem either by actively doing bad stuff without realizing it, or by standing by without a word when bad stuff is being done around them, giving it tacit social approval).

 

http://everydaysexism.tumblr.com

 

 

(right now they're running a campaign to try to improve sexual education in some schools so it includes stuff about consent and healthy relationships, but if you scroll down enough you'll see they just retweet experiences from random people on twitter -- scary to think how it would be if I had to frequently deal with this on an ongoing basis, being treated like a child and/or a juicy steak... I think if most men were transformed into a woman and had to just keep living their lives, they'd get really angry really quickly at how they are treated differently)

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There have always been a great number of very strong minded women in the world. Most just chose to act publicly through a male screen, as it wasn't worth the effort to change the culture. US culture is also not reflective of everywhere else.

 

Madeline Albright was enormously respected in the ME - largely because she was short and dumpy. She just let the US military do the talking for her, bluntly spoke her mind - whether the audience liked it or not, & went for comfort over beauty; the Emir's then heard it again from their spouses (who recognized what she was doing), behind closed doors. Didn't take long for the wise to realize they couldn't win.

 

SD

 

 

 

 

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Guest longinvestor

There have always been a great number of very strong minded women in the world. Most just chose to act publicly through a male screen, as it wasn't worth the effort to change the culture. US culture is also not reflective of everywhere else.

 

Madeline Albright was enormously respected in the ME - largely because she was short and dumpy. She just let the US military do the talking for her, bluntly spoke her mind - whether the audience liked it or not, & went for comfort over beauty; the Emir's then heard it again from their spouses (who recognized what she was doing), behind closed doors. Didn't take long for the wise to realize they couldn't win.

 

SD

 

+1

 

Margaret Thatcher & Indira Gandhi handled themselves in the public domain phenomenally. Perhaps the strongest of leaders in their respective countries in a long time. Not saying all they did was correct all the time. But no one messed around, especially in press conferences.

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