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Warren Buffett's CNBC Interviews with Bill Gates


claphands22
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Not, nicely embedded or organized but here is a link to find all the videos.

 

http://search.cnbc.com/main.do?partnerId=2000&keywords=warren%20buffett&sort=date&minimumrelevance=0.2&type=video&pubtime=30&pubfreq=d&categories=exclude

 

Someone will probably post something better.

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I thought it was interested that Buffett said he bought zero coupon bonds in the early 80s. Here is a link about zero coupon bonds in the early 80s

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/well-need-more-bear-market

 

 

Bonds beat stocks by factor of 11 times from 1981 to 2009

 

Yes, and you'd have been 11 times richer. Listen closely to Shilling's analysis of the past 28 years. In his Insight newsletter he compares the performance of the S&P 500 stock index to the bond market. First he focuses on his "all-time favorite graph" comparing "the results from investing $100 in a 25-year zero-coupon Treasury bond at its yield high (and price low) in October 1981, and rolling it into another 25-year Treasury annually to maintain that 25-year maturity."

 

His bottom line: "On March 31, 2009, that $100 was worth $16,656 with a compound annual return of 20.4%. In contrast, $100 invested in the S&P 500 at its low in July 1982 was worth $1,502 last month for a 10.7% annual return including dividend reinvestment. So Treasurys outperformed stocks by 11.1 times."

 

Never heard of this fabulous alternative? Of course not. Wall Street can't make millions in commissions this way. Instead, during this same 28-year period, Wall Street was using high-pressure sales gimmicks to sell its losers to America's 95 million vulnerable investors.

 

Imagine: If you were in your 20s and just out of college back in 1981, and you started adding a hundred more bucks each and every month using Shilling's zero-coupon strategy, you'd be enjoying early retirement today, instead of crying because your retirement stocks lost half their value.

 

Shilling adds a word of caution about the future: "We've had been recommending long Treasury bonds since 1981. Back then, we forecast secular and huge declines in inflation and interest rates. So we declared that 'we're entering the bond rally of a lifetime.' Unfortunately, that rally is over." We need new strategies.

 

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Big thanks. Had a hard time finding all the videos myself. I think his take on interest rates and long-term bonds is especially insightful.

 

How I wish I had the ability to use money for 30 years with a cost of 100 bp above the government yield...

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Guest wellmont

How I wish I had the ability to use money for 30 years with a cost of 100 bp above the government yield...

 

 

Cash out refi on your paid off home?

 

I argued with someone on motley fool once in 2005 or so. he thought it was a good idea to borrow from his home equity and invest it in the stock market. i argued that they could both go down at the same time. if anybody could do this and make it work it's Buffett. But he doesn't have a mortgage. It's just not worth it. He doesn't borrow in his personal account.

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Thanks for the link.

 

Man, Joe's as annoying as ever. The only time I ever watch CNBC are those interviews; is he like that all the time?

 

Crazy how he's been talking to Warren for years and still asks questions that show that the has no idea how Warren invests.

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How I wish I had the ability to use money for 30 years with a cost of 100 bp above the government yield...

 

 

Cash out refi on your paid off home?

 

I argued with someone on motley fool once in 2005 or so. he thought it was a good idea to borrow from his home equity and invest it in the stock market. i argued that they could both go down at the same time. if anybody could do this and make it work it's Buffett. But he doesn't have a mortgage. It's just not worth it. He doesn't borrow in his personal account.

 

 

Yes I agree. It is not recommended for most people.

 

 

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Thanks for the link.

 

Man, Joe's as annoying as ever. The only time I ever watch CNBC are those interviews; is he like that all the time?

 

Crazy how he's been talking to Warren for years and still asks questions that show that the has no idea how Warren invests.

 

I (unfortunately) watches way too much CNBC for my own good.

It is Joe being Joe. He is like that everyday and every interview.

 

 

 

I like how WEB sent him an Acme brick. hahaha

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How I wish I had the ability to use money for 30 years with a cost of 100 bp above the government yield...

 

 

Cash out refi on your paid off home?

 

I argued with someone on motley fool once in 2005 or so. he thought it was a good idea to borrow from his home equity and invest it in the stock market. i argued that they could both go down at the same time. if anybody could do this and make it work it's Buffett. But he doesn't have a mortgage. It's just not worth it. He doesn't borrow in his personal account.

 

A few Canadian utilize this strategy called the "Smith manuever" wherein you take a Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC) and invest in higher-yielding stocks and the loan is considered tax deductible... in Canada, we do not have the benefit of deducting interest on our principal mortgage like the Americans do and our mortgage rate are usually fixed for a certain period after it resets for the better or worse

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We got some good seats to see Warren and Bill playing some friendly table tennis with Ariel Hsing at Borsheim's on Sunday! Warren is a super agile guy for 82...you can see that Bill is giving him some room here. Enjoy!

 

http://www.cornerofberkshireandfairfax.ca/forum/img/warren-bill-pingpong.jpg

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