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Carb consumption != Insulin resistance?


shalab
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To stir the pot further:

 

 

Popular low-carb authors like Atkins, Eades, and Taubes tend to promote the idea that repeated consumption of carbohydrates causes insulin resistance. This appears to be false. Insulin resistance appears to be caused by excess triglyceride synthesis in the liver.

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To stir the pot further:

 

 

Popular low-carb authors like Atkins, Eades, and Taubes tend to promote the idea that repeated consumption of carbohydrates causes insulin resistance. This appears to be false. Insulin resistance appears to be caused by excess triglyceride synthesis in the liver.

 

Yup.  But guess where excess tryglyceride synthesis comes from : overeating, especially fructose from high fructose syrup, which can't be used by the body in that form, but must be first converted into glycogen that is then converted into tryglycerides and then storage as fat if the body's stores of glycogen are full.

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I believe we will eventually find a significant link between high fructose corn syrup, which is in almost everything and IR.  Interestingly the US sugar farmers lobby have produced some of the highest subsidies and protective import restrictions of any commodity.  The high priced sugar caused food and beverage producers/manufacturers to replace sugar with HFCS.  The diabetic, over-weight syndrome in the US started shortly after HFCS came into usage. I try to avoid HFCS but its very difficult to do.

 

20 years from now we will know a lot more about HFCS and other additives, growth hormones etc.  Theres something universal is causing the global diabetes epidemic.

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You have to differentiate between refined/unrefined and or processed/unprocessed carbs. Unrefined and preferably unprocessed carbs like whole grains, sweet potatoes, potatoes etc. are good for you, refined carbs and some processed carbs like sugar, corn syrup, white bread etc. are typical junk food.

Here is a good video about starches: http://www.drmcdougall.com/video/starch_solution.html

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Asian culture has been eating lots of carbs in their diet for centuries, diabetes has been low and you don't see much obesity. I think it's something else...maybe glycemic index?

 

It isn't as simple as saying "carbs = diabetes" or "carb != diabetes".  People like to take a complicated topic, set up a straw man then knock it down, so they can go on eating what they like and thinking that there is nothing they can do to improve their health.  Someone on this board (I can't remember who) has an excellent quote at the bottom of their posts which says something like "first you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool".

 

If person A consumes rice, coconuts and sweet potatoes and person B consumes white bread, coca-cola, & snickers bars you can't say "look they both ate a lot of carbs and one has diabetes and one doesn't thus carbs doesn't equal diabetes".    If you consume a diet of nutrient dense whole foods and avoid most grains and highly processed/refined anything (but especially wheat, corn, soy and vegetable oils), you will likely be healthy.  If you are already obese and already have diabetes or metabolic syndrome limiting all carbs will help get you back some of your health.  Once you are healthy a whole foods paleo-type diet (containing fat, protein, and carbs) will keep you that way.

 

 

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I've mentioned Chris Masterjohn before, he's one of my favorite bloggers on health topics.  Here is an excellent blog post on dietary dogmatism and an interview where he discusses it:

 

Against Dietary Dogmatism

 

"the third type of dietary dogmatism, when we have a success, we may feel that we've found all the answers for at least ourselves, but this may be a false sense of security ... what is optimal for us might change over time.  We might spend a period of time correcting past deficiencies and imbalances, but perhaps a time will come when we are replete and it is time to tweak our diet again."

 

My Pocast Interview With The Blogger Formerly Known As Low-Carb Hank

 

 

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