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WEB on CNBC Monday with Ted, Todd, and Traci


rogermunibond
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It seems that with each year passing Warren has to be more and more on the media. Not necessarily a good thing in my book.

 

I think he is more about social engineering these days. he definitely wants his ideas on taxation and income inequality out there. and now he wants to make sure everybody understands the succession plan. evidently he is going to highlight the "team" in this year's annual report.

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I think he just enjoys it now, as long as they come to him and it's people who he already knows (he wouldn't fly out to some studio in NYC to talk to some random talking head).

 

He used to be so shy, but I think Kay Graham taught him that these social things could be fun once in a while.

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What would be really cool is if WEB retired from Berkshire and coordinated with Bill Gates to leave his foundation.  They could do a show together on CNBC.  It would be called something like "Hangin' with Warren and Bill".  They would just talk about the day's events, really anything that caught their fancy.  Of course there would be tons of special guests.  How awesome would that be?

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What would be really cool is if WEB retired from Berkshire and coordinated with Bill Gates to leave his foundation.  They could do a show together on CNBC.  It would be called something like "Hangin' with Warren and Bill".  They would just talk about the day's events, really anything that caught their fancy.  Of course there would be tons of special guests.  How awesome would that be?

 

WEB should definitely do this, I mean I'm sure CNBC would pay him more than the pithy $100k he makes at Berkshire.  He should also look at writing a book "Manage your company like Warren Buffett" and maybe even open some sort of online MBA program.

 

He might even make enough to move out of that tiny house in Omaha and buy a real car.  Maybe he'll be able to afford to move out of Omaha to NYC where all the big shot finance people live.  Everyone knows you're not a real investor unless you're from NYC...

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What would be really cool is if WEB retired from Berkshire and coordinated with Bill Gates to leave his foundation.  They could do a show together on CNBC.  It would be called something like "Hangin' with Warren and Bill".  They would just talk about the day's events, really anything that caught their fancy.  Of course there would be tons of special guests.  How awesome would that be?

 

I'd love to see their take on the lightning round. "Hi Warren, I'm thinking of selling Coke." "HOLD HOLD HOLD" "HOLD HOLD HOLD". "IBM has been down a while. What do you think about cutting my losses." "HOLD HOLD HOLD" "HOLD HOLD HOLD" etc.

 

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What would be really cool is if WEB retired from Berkshire and coordinated with Bill Gates to leave his foundation.  They could do a show together on CNBC.  It would be called something like "Hangin' with Warren and Bill".  They would just talk about the day's events, really anything that caught their fancy.  Of course there would be tons of special guests.  How awesome would that be?

 

WEB should definitely do this, I mean I'm sure CNBC would pay him more than the pithy $100k he makes at Berkshire.  He should also look at writing a book "Manage your company like Warren Buffett" and maybe even open some sort of online MBA program.

 

He might even make enough to move out of that tiny house in Omaha and buy a real car.  Maybe he'll be able to afford to move out of Omaha to NYC where all the big shot finance people live.  Everyone knows you're not a real investor unless you're from NYC...

 

Totally.  Serious question though.  Is there any truth to the rumor that WEB plans to join Squawk permanently once he retires and be one of the co-hosts?  That would be so awesome.  I can see it now.  He and Becky could flirt a little.  He and Kernen would bust on each other, while he and Sorkin could roll their eyes at each other over any conservative statement someone makes. 

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I think Ted is number one on the list of successors.

 

Anything specific makes you think that or just a gut feeling?

 

Pure speculation. Buffett has previously said that the CEO/CIO role will be split after his departure. Also, the 2011 letter hints that it's someone who has been with the company for some time:

 

As 2011 started, Todd Combs joined us as an investment manager, and shortly after yearend Ted

Weschler came aboard. Both of these men have outstanding investment skills and a deep commitment

to Berkshire. Each will be handling a few billion dollars in 2012, but they have the brains, judgment

and character to manage our entire portfolio when Charlie and I are no longer running Berkshire.

 

Your Board is equally enthusiastic about my successor as CEO, an individual to whom they have had a

great deal of exposure and whose managerial and human qualities they admire. (We have two superb

back-up candidates as well.)

 

(note that David Sokol resigned in 2011, a year before this letter went out)

 

His successor will probably be one of those managers running around fixing problems.

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Great interview, the 3 T's didn't disappoint. Although Todd and Ted mentioned their personal BRK ownership, would like to hear that it is their largest holding. In a sense, this continuity would carry a lot more weight for me than what they say, buy etc. Coming from the world of PE/hedge funds where ownership is gifted with OPM, eating your own cooking will be a testament that they have transitioned into the ownership culture at BRK. Maybe too early yet.

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Great interview, the 3 T's didn't disappoint. Although Todd and Ted mentioned their personal BRK ownership, would like to hear that it is their largest holding. In a sense, this continuity would carry a lot more weight for me than what they say, buy etc. Coming from the world of PE/hedge funds where ownership is gifted with OPM, eating your own cooking will be a testament that they have transitioned into the ownership culture at BRK. Maybe too early yet.

 

Anyone have the link to the full interview?

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His summation applies to legacy DVA.  I think he has to take mgmt at its word that they can wring efficiencies and lower costs from HCP. It makes sense that the primary care part of medicine is going to lower costs overall for the healthcare system but its harder to realize this.  Unlike dialysis, the patients who come into a primary care office are pretty wide open with the ailments and processes they may need at the time of the visit. For the most part, primary care medical offices have reduced cost by substituting nurse practitioner or physician asst time for MD time. This does not always improve outcomes though.

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