Jump to content

Alternatives to Dataroma


SlowAppreciation
 Share

Recommended Posts

I'm working on a project similar to Dataroma, and am trying to improve upon a few parts of it. Additionally, I'm looking for alternatives (e.g., GuruFocus) that might have helpful data as well.

 

I think a lot of the data can be presented more clearly (e.g., charts and graphs), and would also like to see valuation metrics like average P/E, ROE, P/B, per an individual investor's portfolio.

 

So what does everyone wish Dataroma did more of?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dataroma could probably focus on displaying valuation metrics and fundamentals of the Grand Portfolio. Additionally, it would be interesting to see the fundamentals during times of heavy purchasing. Knowing that Wells Fargo is the greatest % of the Grand Protfolio isn't very interesting (most of us could of guess that would be the fact). The Hold Price gives you a little insight but it would be interesting to see other common valuation metrics - especially during quarters where the Super Investors are really buying into positions.

 

You should also look at simplywall.st. It is a site that uses CapitalIQ data to create infographs and appealing data visualization experiences. You can sign up for a free trial period. You can input your own portfolio, use their stock stock screener, and also use their own 'snowflake' visual summary to get ideas and quickly screen a stock. For me, it is mostly fluff that is unnecessary; but I can recognize the potential as a product for sure.

 

Here is an intro to simplywall.st snowflake

https://simplywall.st/learning-center/snowflake-introduction

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dataroma could probably focus on displaying valuation metrics and fundamentals of the Grand Portfolio. Additionally, it would be interesting to see the fundamentals during times of heavy purchasing. Knowing that Wells Fargo is the greatest % of the Grand Protfolio isn't very interesting (most of us could of guess that would be the fact). The Hold Price gives you a little insight but it would be interesting to see other common valuation metrics - especially during quarters where the Super Investors are really buying into positions.

 

You should also look at simplywall.st. It is a site that uses CapitalIQ data to create infographs and appealing data visualization experiences. You can sign up for a free trial period. You can input your own portfolio, use their stock stock screener, and also use their own 'snowflake' visual summary to get ideas and quickly screen a stock. For me, it is mostly fluff that is unnecessary; but I can recognize the potential as a product for sure.

 

Here is an intro to simplywall.st snowflake

https://simplywall.st/learning-center/snowflake-introduction

 

Good idea to look at periods of heavy buying. I also think looking at who sells or buys when there is turmoil in the markets is another interesting one. I'll play around and see what I can come up with.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

A Few ideas:

 

*Filter for only the 'Superinvestors' the user is interested in.

*Along with the "% of total portfolio" show an overweight/underweight table relative to the index weight.

*More historical data.

*Showing how basic copying strategies would have performed. ie. if you own the 75-80% of the companies owned by these investors, has that historically been better than owning the index as a whole (by enough of a margin to cover the added costs). This is dangerous anyway. I'm not sure if new investors are added after a good multiyear run etc.

*Table in excel with columns for #investors, company ,sector, hold price. It's a bit of a pain to get the table data off there currently.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

*Filter for only the 'Superinvestors' the user is interested in.

 

 

What I'm building will have this option

 

 

*Along with the "% of total portfolio" show an overweight/underweight table relative to the index weight.

 

 

Meaning if GOOG = 1% of total S&P market cap, and Investor X has 10% in their portfolio, they would be 10x overweight versus benchmark?

 

 

*More historical data.

 

 

At the start it will only go back to Q2 2013 since the SEC made scraping 13Fs easier then. I'm trying to go back earlier but it may be challenging

 

 

*Showing how basic copying strategies would have performed. ie. if you own the 75-80% of the companies owned by these investors, has that historically been better than owning the index as a whole (by enough of a margin to cover the added costs). This is dangerous anyway. I'm not sure if new investors are added after a good multiyear run etc.

 

 

This will be difficult, and a lot of it comes down to how you measure performance and the quality of data. I'm open to suggestions, but there are a whole number of challenges with presenting this in a clear, fair, and meaningful way. For example, what do you do about dividend payouts, acquisitions, spin offs, etc... it's very very hard to track with only a quarterly snapshot of each investor's portfolio.

 

 

*Table in excel with columns for #investors, company ,sector, hold price. It's a bit of a pain to get the table data off there currently.

 

I'll have this laid out more cleanly than the other 13F trackers that currently exist, but probably won't have sector.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...