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Principles: Life and Work - Ray Dalio


boilermaker75
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I recently checked this book out from the library and found it to be worth the price I paid for it. 

 

Not much in the way of actionable insights, but if you're into amusing levels of narcissism, the book delivers in spades. It serves as a great illustration of the "Shoe Button Complex" identified by Buffett and Munger.

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I recently checked this book out from the library and found it to be worth the price I paid for it. 

 

Not much in the way of actionable insights, but if you're into amusing levels of narcissism, the book delivers in spades. It serves as a great illustration of the "Shoe Button Complex" identified by Buffett and Munger.

Well played! The name, shoe button, is way out of date, but the behaviour is ever with us.

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I recently checked this book out from the library and found it to be worth the price I paid for it. 

 

Not much in the way of actionable insights, but if you're into amusing levels of narcissism, the book delivers in spades. It serves as a great illustration of the "Shoe Button Complex" identified by Buffett and Munger.

 

Yeah, I had little interest in this from the first time I heard he was releasing a book. He's just that guy who rubs me the wrong way and I really don't know why. Maybe his ego? Who knows.

 

Funny, narcissism is the first thought that came to mind when I heard too. Of course it doesn't help that some describe Bridgewater as being somewhat cultish.

 

I had to look up shoe button but it did make me laugh and I think you're right on with that.

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I've really been enjoying Dalio's book. He reads the audio version (except for one chapter in the middle, oddly).

 

I think there's a lot of merit in the principles he espouses. I guess a lot of it is common sense type stuff, but you could say that about most of what Buffett/Munger say as well. It just turns out common sense isn't so common. Some of what he talks about I learned previously the same way he did: mistakes and lost money. I've recently started trying to document my ideas a bit better and seek criticism (something this site is great for if I could ever make it past step 1).

 

His life goal was always the same as Buffett/Munger: be independent and work with people he found interesting. Like them he overshot. Although a lot of people say that without it necessarily being true.

 

I'd suggest the Farnam Street podcast interview before buying the book. The book is basically a longer, more detailed version of that interview

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