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The Revenge of Wen Jiabao


PlanMaestro
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It's interesting that the allegations against Gu Xilai begin with evidence gathered by Wang Lijun, the former police chief who visited the U.S. consulate. Chinese authorities did not autopsy Heywood, and they cremated his body within 36 hours of discovery. The reports of cyanide stem from Lijun's personal investigation within those 36 hours. Now "chinese officials" are leaking narratives about motivation and means. One often quoted "source", Wang Kang, is alternatively described as a "liberal academic", "well-connected businessman", and "film-maker" whose sources include "officials close to the case" and "family members of Bo Xilai".

 

This case is reading like the annual report of a reverse merger company.

 

 

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This case is reading like the annual report of a reverse merger company.

You just made my day ;D

 

LOL

 

What's different, though, is that a reverse merger company company at this stage would produce a report by accountants or consultants stating that everything is OK, not to worry. ;).

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  • 3 weeks later...

Fukuyama

 

China has banished Bo but not the ‘bad emperor’ problem

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/c71ff938-99c9-11e1-aa6d-00144feabdc0.html#axzz1uh9jfkw7

 

This is why the recently purged Bo Xilai was such a threat to the system. Using his base in Chongqing, he used the media to build up his own authority, which was strong already given his status as a princeling, or son of a revolutionary hero. He was ruthless in the use of state power to go after not just criminals and corrupt officials but businessmen and rivals who had accumulated too much power and wealth. He revived Mao-era mobilisation tactics such as the singing of revolutionary songs at rallies. Unlike his grey compatriots, he could have dominated the CPC leadership through an independent power base had he been promoted to the standing committee. It therefore makes sense that Hu Jintao and the leadership should use the scandal to eliminate him from consideration and remove the bad emperor before he ascended to the throne. The incident has revealed a deep problem in China – the lack of formal institutions and of a real rule of law. The rules the Chinese leadership follows are neither embedded in the constitution, clearly articulated, nor enforced by a judicial system. They are internal rules of the CPC, which have to be inferred from its behaviour. Had Mr Bo succeeded in getting on to the standing committee, he could have overturned them.

 

So the apparent institutionalisation of the Chinese authoritarian system is largely a mirage. The CPC has not solved the bad emperor problem, nor will it until it develops something like a genuine rule of law with all of the transparency and formal institutionalisation that entails.

 

 

 

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  • 2 months later...

Gu Kailai declared ‘main perpetrator’

 

Chinese prosecutors have accused Gu Kailai, wife of fallen politician Bo Xilai, of being the “main perpetrator” in the alleged murder of UK businessman Neil Heywood, signalling that China’s most anticipated trial in decades will produce a guilty verdict, the FT reports. Separately, Bloomberg reports that Gu failed to contest the charges that she poisoned Heywood.

 

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-08-09/bo-s-wife-didn-t-contest-murder-charges-court-official-says.html?ftcamp=crm/email/2012810/nbe/beyondbricsLondon/product

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