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Being Wrong: Adventures in the Margin of Error


JEast
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  • 4 years later...

Along the same lines, http://www.farnamstreetblog.com/2015/04/ray-dalio-not-knowing/

 

There’s an art to this process of seeking out thoughtful disagreement. People who are successful at it realize that there is always some probability they might be wrong and that it’s worth the effort to consider what others are saying — not simply the others’ conclusions, but the reasoning behind them — to be assured that they aren’t making a mistake themselves. They approach disagreement with curiosity, not antagonism, and are what I call “open-minded and assertive at the same time.” This means that they possess the ability to calmly take in what other people are thinking rather than block it out, and to clearly lay out the reasons why they haven’t reached the same conclusion. They are able to listen carefully and objectively to the reasoning behind differing opinions.

 

When most people hear me describe this approach, they typically say, “No problem, I’m open-minded!” But what they really mean is that they’re open to being wrong. True open-mindedness is an entirely different mind-set. It is a process of being intensely worried about being wrong and asking questions instead of defending a position. It demands that you get over your ego-driven desire to have whatever answer you happen to have in your head be right. Instead, you need to actively question all of your opinions and seek out the reasoning behind alternative points of view.

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I can sum this book up in a few sentences. People have this visceral reaction when they look at and think about their own mistakes. The author argues that getting comfortable with this feeling is the key to learning and growing.

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I can sum this book up in a few sentences. People have this visceral reaction when they look at and think about their own mistakes. The author argues that getting comfortable with this feeling is the key to learning and growing.

 

Couldn't agree more. Cold detachment is the key to judgement based fields (but I am not sold on that being the best way to live).

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I can sum this book up in a few sentences. People have this visceral reaction when they look at and think about their own mistakes. The author argues that getting comfortable with this feeling is the key to learning and growing.

 

Thanks for saving us $9 :)

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