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Phil Fisher's Scuttlebutt Get's Taken to Super Nasty Extremes


DooDiligence
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This was interesting, the 21st century version of a musical Christmas card except you get to hear how bad a job the CEO is doing instead.

 

 

Along with paper proxy-vote cards, the hedge fund mailed rechargeable video players, slightly smaller than an iPad, loaded with a four-minute attack ad—alleging Kleinfeld “has the worst track record of any CEO in the S&P 500 over his tenure”—that played automatically when investors opened the package. Sent to tens of thousands of large retail shareholders, the gimmick alone cost Elliott as much as $3 million, proxy contest advisers estimate.
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This was interesting, the 21st century version of a musical Christmas card except you get to hear how bad a job the CEO is doing instead.

 

 

Along with paper proxy-vote cards, the hedge fund mailed rechargeable video players, slightly smaller than an iPad, loaded with a four-minute attack ad—alleging Kleinfeld “has the worst track record of any CEO in the S&P 500 over his tenure”—that played automatically when investors opened the package. Sent to tens of thousands of large retail shareholders, the gimmick alone cost Elliott as much as $3 million, proxy contest advisers estimate.

 

Klause certainly was a douche (I’ll bet he wears monogrammed sweater vests, a lot.)

 

Kirchner was a loud mouthed twat too.

 

It all just struck me as a very different use of scuttlebutt (these guys play for keeps.)

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Agree with the critics that people's personal lives and especially the personal lives of their family should be off limits. Kleinfeld did a decent job for Alcoa, but his downfall to me was overpaying for a few deals that didn't materialize. Maybe at the end of the day they do. Regardless, I think that's the lens that should be used for a CEO, not creeping into their personal affairs.

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Agree with the critics that people's personal lives and especially the personal lives of their family should be off limits. Kleinfeld did a decent job for Alcoa, but his downfall to me was overpaying for a few deals that didn't materialize. Maybe at the end of the day they do. Regardless, I think that's the lens that should be used for a CEO, not creeping into their personal affairs.

 

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Agree with the critics that people's personal lives and especially the personal lives of their family should be off limits. Kleinfeld did a decent job for Alcoa, but his downfall to me was overpaying for a few deals that didn't materialize. Maybe at the end of the day they do. Regardless, I think that's the lens that should be used for a CEO, not creeping into their personal affairs.

 

The flipside argument is that when billions of $ are on the line, nothing is off limits when it comes to personal lives.

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Agree with the critics that people's personal lives and especially the personal lives of their family should be off limits. Kleinfeld did a decent job for Alcoa, but his downfall to me was overpaying for a few deals that didn't materialize. Maybe at the end of the day they do. Regardless, I think that's the lens that should be used for a CEO, not creeping into their personal affairs.

 

The flipside argument is that when billions of $ are on the line, nothing is off limits when it comes to personal lives.

Sounds like a faustian bargain, if there ever was one. I said should as I'd hope people have some personal ethics in these sorts of things.

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Agree with the critics that people's personal lives and especially the personal lives of their family should be off limits. Kleinfeld did a decent job for Alcoa, but his downfall to me was overpaying for a few deals that didn't materialize. Maybe at the end of the day they do. Regardless, I think that's the lens that should be used for a CEO, not creeping into their personal affairs.

 

The flipside argument is that when billions of $ are on the line, nothing is off limits when it comes to personal lives.

Sounds like a faustian bargain, if there ever was one. I said should as I'd hope people have some personal ethics in these sorts of things.

 

Personal ethics goes out of the window way below $ billions...  :-\

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Agree with the critics that people's personal lives and especially the personal lives of their family should be off limits. Kleinfeld did a decent job for Alcoa, but his downfall to me was overpaying for a few deals that didn't materialize. Maybe at the end of the day they do. Regardless, I think that's the lens that should be used for a CEO, not creeping into their personal affairs.

 

The flipside argument is that when billions of $ are on the line, nothing is off limits when it comes to personal lives.

Sounds like a faustian bargain, if there ever was one. I said should as I'd hope people have some personal ethics in these sorts of things.

 

I once found out one of the board members of a company I was looking at had a mistress through some of the same research described which caused me to pass on investing. Once you become a public figure I think you should expect to lose some of that privilege.

 

Would never have used it against them though.

 

 

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