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Can Ron Paul Bust "The Privately Held Bank" in The U.S. Peacefully?


Guest ValueCarl
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What are the chances of the US monetary system being placed into the hands of its People again?   

26 members have voted

  1. 1. What are the chances of the US monetary system being placed into the hands of its People again?

    • 0%
    • Flip of a coin
    • Not in our lifetime
    • Only with a revolution
    • It's a ruse; pay no attention


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Guest ValueCarl

For U.S. citizens no issue has been greater, since the dawn of its creation. However, if a new monetary system were ever to be established again, this board had an outstanding thread visiting Ben Graham's commodity basket as one means-his Bretton Woods pitch- versus going back to an outdated, exclusive "gold" model, one less representative of the world's economic power. I would add that if it were remotely possible to convert to a "commodity basket," broadband should NOT be excluded from establishing the price of such currency.

 

I would bet the Rockefeller and Rothschild rabble rouser, trouble making banking dynasties are actually worried right now unless Ron Paul himself is a ruse, which I seem to doubt.

 

If Ron Paul is not a ruse for some more nefarious group tied to some purposeful plot, he is an American patriot who I would stand with and vote for if given the chance in 2012. God help America, if they pave the way for that narcissistic, wealth destroyer of "public partners," Donald, The Bad Hair, Trump. imo          

 

http://finance.yahoo.com/video/marketnews-19148628/paul-calls-bernanke-news-conference-sign-of-progress-25040344;_ylt=A9G_R0UJP7hNS7UAThq7YWsA;_ylu=X3oDMTExdXU5YW1jBHBvcwM2BHNlYwN2aWRlb3MEc2xrA3BhdWxjYWxsc2Jlcg--        

 

The founding fathers may be rising from their graves to cheer us on soon.  8)

 

“I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies.” – Thomas Jefferson

 

"If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their  currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks…will deprive the people of  all property until their children wake-up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered…. The issuing power should be taken from the banks and restored to the people, to whom it properly belongs." – Thomas Jefferson in the debate over the Re-charter of the Bank Bill (1809)

 

"History records that the money changers have used every form of abuse, intrigue, deceit, and violent means possible to maintain their control over governments by  controlling money and its issuance." -James Madison

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Ron Paul is the man... I am guessing that since you want broad band as part of backing a currency, you are long level 3? ;P

 

Anyway, Ben Graham did some really cool stuff back in the day. I am starting on these, even though from what I gather, it has been something talked about on this board and something that I have already thought about. :)

 

http://www.amazon.com/Commodities-Currency-Benjamin-Graham-Classics/dp/0070248060

http://www.amazon.com/Storage-Stability-Original-Benjamin-Graham/dp/007162631X/ref=pd_sim_b_2

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Guest ValueCarl

My broadband inclusion is less shameless than you might think, but you're correct. My money is usually where my mouth is inclusive of whatever intellect I might have that got my money there in the first place!  ;D Ron Paul is not much different with his "gold thesis," but I think gold alone can no longer serve the purpose it may have once provided.   

 

I wrote something about my thoughts on this "broadband" commodity some months back whilst comparing "peak oil" and providing an outstanding lecture from a Colorado University professor, dated back in the 1970's, I believe, in which I posted the video on Yahoo Finance somewhere inside the LVLT thread. It was a "reverse engineering" and "inversion" of the concept without delving deeper.

 

The gist of it was that, "broadband" is a crucial commodity that we must not take for granted nor "waste." We must utilize it wisely in the form of public/private partnerships understanding full well that in the long term, the better we had managed it, the better the world will have become for doing so.  ;)   

 

In the mean time, I like the chutzpa that Ron Paul continues to display!  ;D 

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Guest Bronco

Ron Paul makes sense on a lot of subjects but he comes across like a nut job and is viewed accordingly.  Ask the coach of the Sabres - whining doesn't get you anywhere. 

 

 

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My broadband inclusion is less shameless than you might think, but you're correct. My money is usually where my mouth is inclusive of whatever intellect I might have that got my money there in the first place!  ;D Ron Paul is not much different with his "gold thesis," but I think gold alone can no longer serve the purpose it may have once provided.     

 

I wrote something about my thoughts on this "broadband" commodity some months back whilst comparing "peak oil" and providing an outstanding lecture from a Colorado University professor, dated back in the 1970's, I believe, in which I posted the video on Yahoo Finance somewhere inside the LVLT thread. It was a "reverse engineering" and "inversion" of the concept without delving deeper.

 

The gist of it was that, "broadband" is a crucial commodity that we must not take for granted nor "waste." We must utilize it wisely in the form of public/private partnerships understanding full well that in the long term, the better we had managed it, the better the world will have become for doing so.  ;)   

 

In the mean time, I like the chutzpa that Ron Paul continues to display!  ;D   

 

Oh, yeah, there is no doubt that broadband is important... The only problem that I could see with it is the whole redeemability of it. I can't redeem a dollar for broadband per se. I can do that with oil, gold, or sea shells. The broadband only works if there is power and such for it. I really like the idea of a basket of goods for backing a currency, in large part, to protect from currency black swans; for example what happens if an alchemist finally can turn sand into gold? While it seems far fetched, a similar thing happened with aluminum in the 1800s (read some stuff on wikipedia about the cap on the washington monument.).

 

Regardless, I can not fathom a monetary system that could be much worse than ours (I am talking in terms of structure, not application)

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Guest ValueCarl

We have great, gifted minds in this nation as well as the globe assuming they're allowed to flourish in solving problems like currency, one that will be much more difficult to manipulate because of the whims of banking dynasties who remain intent on depriving the human race of reaching their maximum potential! I'll be thinking about a way to ascribe "value" to a unit of "broadband," which I believe you can if we think hard enough!  ;D   

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We have great, gifted minds in this nation as well as the globe assuming they're allowed to flourish in solving problems like currency, one that will be much more difficult to manipulate because of the whims of banking dynasties who remain intent on depriving the human race of reaching their maximum potential! I'll be thinking about a way to ascribe "value" to a unit of "broadband," which I believe you can if we think hard enough!  ;D     

 

I had always assumed that the way it would work would be a kin to a unit of electricity floating around on the grid. You have the right to use it, but, there will still be a little bit of counterpart risk. Only with broadband, I guess you would be getting a set amount of information, say, $100 dollars is backed by 3 grams of gold, a gallon of oil, ounce of copper, bushel of corn, and a terabyte of downloaded information via broadband (obviously, my numbers are arbitrary, but, you get the idea).

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Guest ValueCarl

The interesting thing about "broadband" or the "fiber" capacity available to measure(quantify) for ascribing a value to it, is that, its supply side limitations, at least today, seems to be constrained tomorrow, by the speed at which it can be laid in the ground for utilization.  

 

Therefore, the first question to be asked, might be, how much fiber capacity can be sunk into the earth today in order to supply information around the globe, inclusive of all known technologies on top of all known applications to be deployed over it and at what cost would that be, today, if all that "capacity" was simultaneously lit for use while being CONSUMED?

 

I guess what I am saying is that, fiber is limited to the conduits which contain them in the ground before digging up the earth again to lay new conduits which will be supplied by the newest, state of the art "fiber" once invented and/or the newest technologies for slicing and dicing it in order to ascertain more "useful life" from the same fiber strands. So fiber by itself may be unlimited, but the ability to deploy new fiber efficiently is limited by its "containers" once already lit or in use.  

 

There's one carrier on this planet who knows that answer, at least in the U.S., and possibly in Europe too. At today's prices and technologies, I believe I calculated something like a "trillion US dollars," if the network was filled to its brim today including all of its multi-conduits in the ground, and without embarking upon a new dig to be "reserved" for as some factor moving ahead while assuming "terrestrial" delivery methods remain "best of breed" for "transporting data."  Advances in technologies would increase that "aggregate dollar" number over time, assuming price degradation as a result of "silicon economics" weren't to depreciate its value as it has leading into this information revolution thus far.      

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