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Capital Returns: Investing Through the Capital Cycle: A Money Manager's Reports


vikx01
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I just started reading the following book a couple of days ago. Seems to be an amazingly good read so far. There are lovely excerpts from their annual reports on what they call the "Capital Cycle". There is some very good industry analysis.

 

 

[amazonsearch]Capital Returns: Investing Through the Capital Cycle: A Money Manager's Reports 2002-15[/amazonsearch]

 

Once I finish this, I'll try to get a hold of his (Edward Chancellor's) previous book ([amazonsearch]Capital Account: A Fund Manager Reports on a Turbulent Decade, 1993-2002[/amazonsearch]) on Marathon Asset's annual reports from the 90's. I read his [amazonsearch]Devil Take the Hindmost: a History of Financial Speculation[/amazonsearch] a while back and loved it. It's of the same category as [amazonsearch]Manias, Panics and Crashes: A History of Financial Crises[/amazonsearch] by Kindleberger

 

Does anyone have letters from Marathon Asset Management? They seem to have outperformed indexes by about 5% annually since inception in 1987 (http://www.marathon.co.uk/International-Equity.aspx,) but more than that the letters would pack a lot of investing wisdom.

 

Neil Ostrer's interviews:

1. From 2014 https://personal.vanguard.com/us/insights/article/marathon-manager-interview-122014

2. From 2007 https://www.phoenix-ir.com/fund_manager/docs/Ostrer_Jan_07.pdf

 

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I got mine (kindle book) from Amazon.com (the US site.)

I'm 3/4th way through it and it's a very good book indeed.

 

There is one place where he (likely Ostrer) quotes Johann Rupert (of Richemont) as this:

“No, no, no, no. I didn’t lose a lot of money when I tried to sell the business. I lost the money when I bought the bloody thing. That’s when you park your money, it’s not when you try to find a bigger idiot than you to take it off your hands.”

 

...simply classic.

 

Here's another:

“[There are] three stages of [an] acquisition, which [are] euphoria and then disillusionment. And the next thing is looking for somebody to blame for buying the place.”

 

and a funny but profound one ...

“The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. But you only find out when you climb over that the reason why it’s greener is because of all the cow dung hidden in the grass. And as soon as you start stepping in all this stuff then you wonder why you ever crossed the fence.”

 

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I got mine (kindle book) from Amazon.com (the US site.)

I'm 3/4th way through it and it's a very good book indeed.

 

There is one place where he (likely Ostrer) quotes Johann Rupert (of Richemont) as this:

“No, no, no, no. I didn’t lose a lot of money when I tried to sell the business. I lost the money when I bought the bloody thing. That’s when you park your money, it’s not when you try to find a bigger idiot than you to take it off your hands.”

 

...simply classic.

 

Here's another:

“[There are] three stages of [an] acquisition, which [are] euphoria and then disillusionment. And the next thing is looking for somebody to blame for buying the place.”

 

and a funny but profound one ...

“The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence. But you only find out when you climb over that the reason why it’s greener is because of all the cow dung hidden in the grass. And as soon as you start stepping in all this stuff then you wonder why you ever crossed the fence.”

 

Thanks! I actually just got my kindle 5 days ago so I should be able to buy it. Would have been nice if his previous book also had a digital version.

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  • 1 year later...

JayGatsby - I read capital account a couple years ago and will post my detailed notes this week.  I should still have the copy and if so, would be glad to lend it to you.

 

Chris

 

I'm not advocating for anything illegal, but I think the world would benefit if *someone* photocopied this and shared this with the world, a la Klarman's Margin of Safety :)

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JayGatsby - I read capital account a couple years ago and will post my detailed notes this week.  I should still have the copy and if so, would be glad to lend it to you.

 

Chris

 

I'm not advocating for anything illegal, but I think the world would benefit if *someone* photocopied this and shared this with the world, a la Klarman's Margin of Safety :)

 

Wow - a purported value investor that doesn't understand what theft is.

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JayGatsby - I read capital account a couple years ago and will post my detailed notes this week.  I should still have the copy and if so, would be glad to lend it to you.

 

Chris

 

I'm not advocating for anything illegal, but I think the world would benefit if *someone* photocopied this and shared this with the world, a la Klarman's Margin of Safety :)

 

Wow - a purported value investor that doesn't understand what theft is.

 

I've been thinking about this.  If a book is out of print then who are you stealing from if you read a photocopy?  Not the owners of the existing copies - they don't own the IP.  And arguably not the author, who is not losing sales and seems to show no interest in satisfying the demand for his work.  I'm approaching this from a moral standpoint, not a legal one. 

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Here are my notes on Capital Account from a few years ago.  I just checked on Amazon and I bought the book for $24 in July of 2014 and it is now priced at $300+, which makes me think that I am better at investing in undervalued books than common stocks and should reallocate! 

 

http://www.boardofbooks.com/capital-account/review-and-notes/

 

There are a lot of parallels with the capital cycle strategy discussed in the book and recent events (Telsa/EVs, solar, natural gas frackers, etc.).  Hope my notes help.

 

Chris

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  • 3 months later...
Guest notorious546

anyone have any book recommendations that are similar to this one? IE) global investing rather than just usa

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anyone have any book recommendations that are similar to this one? IE) global investing rather than just usa

They're fairly different but I really like Jim Rogers' books if you're interested in global investing. He's been an extremely successful "emerging market" investor. If I remember right, Street Smarts was the high level summary written later. Investment Biker and Adventure Capitalist are the stories of his trips around the world (1989 and 2000, respectively). The reason I put emerging markets in quotes is he's critical of the idea of emerging markets as an asset class and was early on saying that BRIC was a flawed concept. His basic edge was just going places and talking to people. That gave him the actual understanding of the cultures and governments in which he was investing, while most asset managers were just reading about it. As an example, his counter to bullishness on India has always been to tell people to try driving across it. He's always been positive on China because he saw the ingenuity and work ethic of the people when he first rode across it sometime in the 80's. He likes situations where the political/economic culture is changing. There's a video of him online buying paper shares at a window in China... I think just as the exchange was being established if I remember right and probably as the first American to buy shares. Some people criticize him for possibly being overly negative on the current monetary situation... I guess we'll see.

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